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RECORD OF EVENTS 



IN THE 



WALTHAM SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



1940 - 1941 







Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster 



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WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL 



1940 - 1941 




WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS 



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THE MIRROR 



Vol. XXXII 



Waltham, Mass. 



No. 3 



"-to b.oIo as 'ifnere , tlje mirror up to nature." 
Hamlet, Act III, Sc. ii 

Editorial Staff 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

Andrew Meyer 

ASSISTANT EDITORS-IN-CHIEF 
Joyce Hitchcock Joan McClutchy 

BUSINESS MANAGER ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER 

James Zografos William Calkins 

ADVERTISING MANAGER 

Sumner Dolber 

ASSISTANT ADVERTISING MANAGERS 

Louise Giminarda Paul Washburn George Kaitz 

Russell Carlson Robert Shedd 

ART EDITOR EXCHANGE EDITOR 

William Boisvert Marguerite Donnelly 

ALUMNI EDITOR MUSIC EDITORS 

Edwina Wilkie Miriam Rouffe 

Irene Kilpatrick 

HUMOR EDITOR STAFF SECRETARY 

Howard Gadboys Dorothy Ellis 

STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER PUBLICITY MANAGER 

Russell Longley Charles Pepper 

SPORTS EDITORS 

Warren Towne Doris Besso 

LITERARY COMMITTEE 

Ruth Greene, Chairman 

Patricia Power, Assistant Chairman 

Jacqueline Barrows Richard Meade 

Doris Ann Besso John Moynihan 

Phyllis Cronin Marie Murphy 

Mildred Edwardson Gladys S. Nottenburg 

Richard Erickson Charles Olney 

Harold Ferguson Carol Otterson 

Shirley Gray Ruth Power 

Gertrude Green Barbara Stenstrom 

Elaine Harnish Sally Thomdike 

Robert Healy Lowell Warren 
Joanne Horgan 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Literary Department Miss Viets 

Business Department Mr. Woodman 

Art Department Miss Burgess 

Arrangement, Make-up and Presswork by the Pupils of the Waltham Trade School Printing Shop 

under the direction of Mr. J. H. Nottenburg 



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j Class of 1941 | 

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COMMENCEMENT ISSUE j 

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| Charles W. Goodrich, Headmaster \ 

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j Waltham High School — Then and Now j 

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I Class Poem Jacqueline Barrows j 

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j Class History Mildred Edwardson j 

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I Class Will Ruth Greene I 

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| Class Prophecy Andrew Meyer I 

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j Who's Who I 

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j School Activities | 

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{ Athletics j 

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Our School 




About 1915 



Waltham Senior High School 







J i' yv\ 4i ■ 

77 "Hi 7 7 i 




1918 — At the left of the school building note the war gardens planted 
to get the better of old "High Cost of Living" 



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OUR SCHOOL-TODAY 




1826-1849 Located where the present North 
Junior High stands, in the lower story of a 
building referred to as the Town School. It con- 
sisted of one classroom. There were no grad- 
uation exercises — a student upon completing 
his work simply left school. 

1849 Beginning of a true High School, with im- 
provements instituted such as the grading sys- 
tem, a grammar department, language and 
mathematics courses, and the ability to prepare 
students for college. 

1869 The High School left its original site, and 
a building known as the Old High was erected 
at the corner of Church and School Streets. 



1902 The central structure of the present High 
School was built to keep up with the increas- 
ing development of the community. 

1935 Completion of the east and west wings 
and the elimination of a morning and afternoon 
session. 

1936 The large gymnasium in the rear of the 
east wing was completed, permitting the old 
gym to be used as a cafeteria. 

1939 Addition of five new rooms to the cast 
wing. 

What will the next few years bring forth ? 



Class of 1941- 



Class Poem 



A GOAL 

For each, according to his will, 

There is a niche which he can fill — 

And so it seemeth right to me 

That God would really like to see 

This group step forth, and out of stress, 

Create a wealth of happiness. 

Let each prepare to do his best — 

At every task and meet the test 

Of Life, which now ahead does lie; 

And conquer all with hopes held high. 

We may be hurt along the way, 

But there's a 'morrow for today. 

And God will guide us long the years, 

With equal share of joy and tears. 

He'll lead us on with courage true, 

To do those things He'd have us do. 

He'll not destroy our firm ideas, 

But give us faith that's free from fears, 

To reach the goal and hear, "Well done, 

And welcome, Class of '41." 

Jacqueline Barrows, 

Class of 1941. 






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MR. GEORGE L. WARD, Sub-Master 
Senior Class Advisor 



O 
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SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Standing: George Cox, Auditor; Richard Bennett, President 
Seated: Shirley Higgins, Secretary-Treasurer; Marie Mur- 
phy, Vice-President 






Who's Who 



Boy Most Likely To Succeed 

Girl Most Likely To Succeed 

Most Popular Boy 

Most Popular Girl 

Best Looking Boy 

Best Looking Girl 

Class Wit 

Best Dressed Boy 

Best Dressed Girl 

Brightest Social Light 

Most Athletic Boy 

Most Athletic Girl 

Personality Plus 

Glamour Girl 

Most Studious Boy 

Most Studious Girl 

Best Actor 

Best Actress 



Andrew Meyer 
Elaine Harnish 
Richard Bennett 
Marie Murphy- 
Russell Longley 
Pauline Dicks 
Robert Elder 
Richard Smelledge 
June Ralph 
Pauline Dicks 
William Manning 
Doris Jacobs 
Marie Murphy 
Phyllis Keith 
Robert Healy 
Elaine Harnish 
Leon Ginsburg 
Mildred Edwardson 



>«««— — — ■■— ————Class of 1 94 1 - — — °— — ■ — ° — °— ° 



MARSHAL ADAMo^ 

Business Course 

Seeing ahead to the day when he'll 
be president of some investment 
business, he scowls daily over the 
stock market, and keeps himself on 
the honor roll. Peppers his speech 
with "you know". On Senior Nom- 
inating Committee. Likes Semi-classics, 
and Ford Sunday Evening Hour. 



*«:: - 



WILLIAM HOPKINS AIKEN 

Technical Course 

Bill plans to become a marine after 
attending "some" technical school. 
This "quiet" senior whiles away his 
time reading detective and mystery 
stories, preferably by Ellery Queen 
and Conan Doyle, works out cross- 
word puzzles also. He likes Fibber 
McGee and Fred Allen on the radio. 
His best virtue must be telling the 
truth for he honestly admits not do- 
ing his homework — which probably 
accounts for his expression "So I'm 
worried". 



BASIL JOSEPH ALISEO 

("Babe" "Smokey") 

Business Course 

Pet dislike is silly girls. Pet like 
is running to the store for practice, 
for he is a member of the '40-'41 
track team. Ambition is to go to 
art school. Hobby is drawing movie 
stars. Favorite radio program is 
Gang Busters. Plans to work on a 
farm for the summer, and then secure 
a position in an office. Worst fault 
is arguing with "Butch". 



ROSE MARIE ATTARDO 

Business Course 

Right now "Rosie" enjoys dancing, 
reading, bike-riding, and going to the 
movies, but later on she would like 
to make good use of her education 
and get a position in an office. She 
likes Bonnie Baker, Orinn Tucker's 
Orchestra and to be in the middle 
"when we are three". Her activities 
include the Commercial Club, Septum 
Club, and the Junior Lodge. You 
will often see her chewing gum or 
hear her saying, "I imagine so." 



MARGUERITE MARIE AUCOIN 

College Course 

"Peg's" destination after leaving 
high school is "undecided." Her hob- 
by is collecting automobile advertise- 
ments. She likes driving, bowling, 
ping-pong, and sundaes. Dislikes 
sophisticated undergrads and week- 
end homework. Her ambition is to 
"have a car of my own." 




GEORGE EDWARD AHERN 

("Georgie") 

Business Course 

Favorite expression is "Hi' Ya." 
Ambition is to be successful, especial- 
ly in the Civil Service Exam for 
Business Machines Operators. Hob- 
bies are photography and postcard 
collecting. Activities include Cafeteria 
Work, Mirror Room Agent '39-'40, 
and Commercial Club. Favorite pro- 
gram is "Fibber McGee". Best vir- 
tue is being as quiet as possible. 
Worst fault is being too small. 
Special mannerism is saying, "Hello" 
to Mr. Mosher. 



RUTH A. ALCOTT 

Practical Arts Course 

Ruth confesses her worst faults are 
staying out late and talking too 
much, but she hopes her best virtvie 
— being good natured — will offset 
those. Her numerous activities in- 
clude Senior Nominating Committee, 
Senior Play Committee, High School 
Reporter, Senior Play Cast, Dramatic 
Club Plays, Archery, Baseball, Field 
Hockey, and Tennis. After attend- 
ing Junior College and art school she 
hopes to be a fashion designer. Act- 
ing her age is one mannerism she is 
trying very hard to conquer! 



BARBARA LOUISE ANDERSON 

("Babs" "Barbie") 

Business Course 

Dislikes oral compositions and "El- 
mer Davis and the News." Hobby is 
collecting miniature dogs. Favorite 
program is the 9 :20 Club. Would 
like very much to be a receptionist, 
after going to business school. Often 
says, "Well, for heaven's sake." 
Commercial Club member. Likes 
dancing and movies. Worst fault is 
biting her fingernails. 



I/^EANNETTE EVANGELINE 
*^ AUCOIN 

Practical Arts Course 
"Naturally my ambition is to get 
married" says "Jay". She'll make 
anyone happy with that delicious 
fudge she makes in her spare time! 
Pet peeve is 9:20 Club while her 
pet like is reading. 



VIRGINIA MAE BAKER 

Business Course 

Virginia is rather on the quiet side, 
but she is a very studious girl. She 
usually has her homework done ahead 
of every one in her class. She is 
active in the Commercial Club. 



-Class of 1941 






ETHEL M. BALBEN 

Practical Arts Course 

Ambition is to travel all over the 
U. S. — favorite expression is "Oh, 
heck!" For a hobby she collects 
souvenirs of any kind at any place — 
Nursing is her destination - — dislikes 
glamour girls — Likes French fried 
potatoes, bike riding, and roller 
skating. 



DONALD A. BROWN 

Practical Arts Course 

Dislikes his middle name but out- 
side of that he likes everything and 
everyone. Sounds a bit like Dale 
Carnegie, eh?) "Dusty" some day is 
going to be a great inventor and 
meanwhile has tinkering and wood- 
working for hobbies. Often says 
"wow-sie" and listens to "Fibber 
McGee." 



ELAINE HOPE BAUMANN 

Teacher's College Course 

"Ellie" likes reading, the movies, 
ice cream, sewing and sports, es- 
pecially bowling, archery, and bas- 
ketball. She wishes to train to be a 
nurse and her destination is the Mas- 
sachusetts General Hospital's Train- 
ing School. Besides participating in 
sports she also is in the Glee Club 
and the chorus of the Operetta. Her 
favorite expression is, "Gee whiz ! 
You can tell." 



/ 



ELEANOR LOUISE BENNETT 

Business Course 

She's "Benny" to her friends, who 
find her exceptionally agreeable. She 
wants to become a secretary, and to see 
the world. Expects to see Washing- 
ton, D. C. or Alaska with Pat. One 
of our straight honor-roll students, 
and treasurer of the Commercial Club. 
She's a southpaw, quiet, and likes 
Kay Kyser, roller-skating and marsh- 
mallow sundaes. 



WALTER A. BENNETT 

Practical Arts Course 

"Rusty's" ambition is to get a 
commission in the navy — and then 
get pensioned off. He dislikes to 
bring too many books home because he 
would rather spend his time listening 
to "Bill Stern Sportlight", 9:20 Club, 
and Symphony music. Activities, Cheer 
Leader (1939). 




ELIZABETH A. BAMFORTH 

Business Machines 

"Barn's" favorite expression "Isn't 
that awful" probably comes from 
telling people just what she thinks 
of them — her worst fault. Likes 
the 9:20 Club and dancing. Eating 
potato chips is her hobby. She 
would like to work in an office. She 
is a member of the Commercial Club. 



JACQUELINE JEAN BARROWS 

Special Course 

"Joe's" hobby and worst fault is 
talking. Being prompt is her best 
virtue. She enjoys 9:20 Club and 
"Those We Love." "Jackie" plans 
to become a dietician and enter Fram- 
ingham State Teachers' College. Of- 
ten says "For Heaven's sake". Ac- 
tivities include Field Hockey, 1 ; Bowl- 
ing 1,3; Archery, 1; Dramatic Club, 
1, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 3; Senior Play, 
3 ; and Literary Staff of Mirror, 3. 



IRENE ALISON BE'ANE 

Clerical Course 

"Dinny" enjoys French frieds, cof- 
fee milk shakes, aviation, and all 
sports. Her destination is Jamaica. 
Her activities include Field Hockey, 
Basketball, Volley-ball, Archery, and 
the Commercial Club. You will often 
see her tapping her fingernails and 
hear her calling out "Hurry up, 
Booth!" 



RICHARD C. BENNETT 

Teachers' College Course 

"Dick" or "Beansy" has been class 
president throughout high school. 
His other activities include Football, 
1, 2, 3; Basketball, 2, 3; (Captain of 
team in '40-'41) ; Track, 2; and S. J. 
H. Alumni Secretary '39-'40. Natur- 
ally his hobby is sports and his am- 
bition is to get to college. His pet 
peeve is answering the phone and 
hearing "Guess who". 



BESSIE CHRISTINE BISHOP 

Practical Arts Course 

Wilfred Academy is "Chickies" 
destination while her ambition is to 
be a hairdresser. "Oh fish" says 
Bessie when anyone orders a special 
fried egg sandwish. Writing letters 
is her hobby and going to Camp is 
too. School activities include the 
Sophomore Dance Committee, Junior 
Nominating Committee and Merry-go- 
Round Club. 






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SUSAN MARY BOCCABELLO 

Business Course 

Still tries to stretch her 5 feet one 
to f teet six. Collects bric-a-brac, 
and hopes to be secretary in a large 
firm. In the Commercial Club; likes 
pie with ice cream, "I Love a Mys- 
tery," and 9:20 Club. 



RALPH J. BOWEN 

Tall, lean, and lank! "Bow" would 
like to be a commissioned officer hi 
the army, which may give reason for 
hi- interest in rifles. Foreign corre- 
spondence is his most interesting hob- 
by. He includes golf and baseball 
in his activities. 






RICHARD HENRY BOISSEAU 

Practical Arts Course 

Dick's destination is his ambition 
and that is to be a commercial ar- 
tist. One can easily see why since 
his hobby is drawing. He dislikes 
homework and Democracy. Glenn 
Miller and Bob Hope programs, bru- 
nettes, and ice cream occupy a great 
deal of his time. The most out- 
standing of all his characteristics is 
his very worst fault — blushing! 



ROLAND J. BONICA 

Business Course 

"Rollie's" ambition is to become 
an accountant after attending Bent- 
ley's. He likes Charlie McCarthy 
and drawing. "You ain't lying" is 
his pet expression. 



ANNE ELIZABETH BOURGEOIS 

Teacher's College Course 

"Annie" dislikes being called "An- 
nie." Also dislikes waiting for 
people. Although she wants to be a 
cowgirl and to go up in an airplane 
her destination is the Waltham Hos- 
pital! Her hobby is keeping a scrap- 
book and bicycle riding. She belongs 
to the Dramatic Club, the Glee Club 
and was in the operetta cast. While 
pinching the dimple on her chin, you 
will often hear her say "Who'da 
thunk it?" 



a 



— — Class of 1941 - — * 




MARY BOGOSIAN 

Likes to hear H. B. talking about 
T. O. and also to hear Mr. Roche 
recite "Hamlet" and "Macbeth". 
Her hobbies number Horse-back Rid- 
ing, Bowling, Drawing and Swimming 
and she frequently says "Can you 
imagine that?" Hopes to have a 
business of her own and be a good 
dress maker and designer. Activities 
include Girls Glee Club and "Naugh- 
ty Marietta." 



JEANNETTE LORRAINE 
BOISSEAU ("Jeannic") 

Teachers' College Course 

Jeanette hopes in the course of her 
ifetime to go to Framingham Nor- 
mal School, go to Alaska, become a 
history teacher, and be a good wife. 
In what order wasn't clearly stated. 
She likes any kind of food. Easy 
Aces, and red. Dislikes : — her lazi- 
ness, and French. Activities : Basket- 
ball, Baseball, and Field Hockey. 



WILLIAM EDWARD BOISVERT 

College Course 

Famous for his humorous cartoons, 
"Lil Bill" hopes to attend the Massa- 
chusetts School of Art. His many 
activities which include Art Editor of 
the Mirror 1940-41, the Committee of 
Properties, Senior Play, 1941 are 
probably the reason for his favorite 
expression "La vie est dur." ("It's a 
tough life," to speak the common ver- 
nacular.) Li'l Bill's hobby is "Get- 
ting stuck with 'Lizzie' $ $ $," says 
he. Along with liking Bob Hope 
and Demarais' blushes, his ecstatic 
moment is when he sits in the middle 
row, fifth seat in Democracy. 



HELENA MARJORIE BOUDREAU 

Practical Arts Course 

Ping Pong and Archery appeal to 
"Hellie", but teachers who give three 
chapters to write out for talking don't. 
Helena is often heard saying "Is 
that so?" She expects to work in the 
Watch Factory after graduating. 
Likes "Those We Love" and danc- 
ing. 



DAVID EDWARD BROOKS 

Special Course 

"Dave" enjoys his harmonica, sea 
stories, and listening to the radio. 
His destination is to take a course 
in mechanics of machinery. "Shucks," 
he will often say as he trys to check 
his worst fault — smoking. 



Class of 1941- 



CARROLL HODGKINS BROWN 

Technical Course 

'Cad's" ambition is to receive a 
graduate degree at Harvard and to 
be a mathematics teacher there. He 
likes to listen to "Henry Aldrich." 
Lending money to Peirce is his worst 
fauit. Cad's activities include the 
Senior Play Committee, Band, and 
and the Honor Roll. 



MARY C. BROWN ("Brownie", 
"Shrimp") 

Business Course 

"Hi. Kid" is Mary's favorite ex- 
pression. Some day she'll go to 
Boston without losing her direction 
Her ambition is to be a successful 
office worker. Her activities include 
Honor Roll. 1, 2, 3; the Commercial 
Club. North Junior Alumnae, Base- 
ball, Bowling, and Field Hockey. 



HELEN M. BUCKLEY 

Being rather sceptical, she often 
sgvs "You wouldn't kid me" or 
"Don't 'cha believe me?" She is 
called "Bo Peep". "Buckie" or 
"Goatie" (anything but Helen) and in- 
tends to be a success in the business 
world. Enjoys Bowling, Skating, 
Dancing, Swimming and Collecting 
Miniatures. She likes to eat ham- 
burgers and drink cokes with M. B. 
at H. J. 



ELVA RITA BURNS 

Clerical Course 

"Skipper" wants to be somebody's 
typist and secretary. She enjoys 
Cooking, Sewing, Jitterbugging, Base- 
ball, Archery. Tennis, Swimming, 
and keeping a diary. Her worst 
fault is teasing Winnie, and playing 
with her bracelets in class. 



YOLANDA S. CACCIATORE 

Special Course 

"Holy Cow! It's the nuts" Yes 
sir, that's "Yola" speaking. Hobbies 
are collecting sport clippings of W. 
H. S. and Cooking. Destination is 
Cambridge Hospital to train to be a 
nurse. Activities : Dramatic Club, 
Glee Club, Operetta Cast. Likes good 
clothes and dislikes waiting. 




BARBARA BRODRICK 

Business Course 

Barb, always wondering, "Do we 
have first or second lunch?" looks 
forward to her usual vacation in 
Maine. She hopes, when she's able 
to take 100 words a minute with ease, 
to work in some doctor's office where 
she'll prove to be the invaluable as- 
sistant. A member of the Commer- 
cial Club ; likes tall people, Jimmy 
Dorsey, and "wide open spaces." 



THOMAS A. BROWN 

Civic Course 

Likes Basketball, Baseball and all 
sports. Known as "Tuba", "Tom" or 
just "T". he wants to get a Civil 
Service job. Favorite expressions are 
"Yeah" or "Looks that way". Played 
on J. V. Football Team. His worst 
fault is listening to McCusker. 



MARY LILLIAN BURLEY 

Clerical Course 

"It ain't hay," shouts "Burl" as 
she listens to the "Lone Ranger". 
Besides this thriller, she also likes ice 
cream, spinach, and daiLcing. She dis- 
likes jitterbugs and onions, and Ben- 
ny Goodman. Her ambition is to 
"book" a millionaire. Besides par- 
ticipating in Basketball. Field Hock- 
ey, Volley Ball, Archery, and Base- 
ball she also belongs to the Com- 
mercial Club, the Old Maids Club 
and Senior Play Cast. 



MARION CACACE 

Practical Arts Course 

"What's new?" says "Pam" or 
"Mary Ann," but hastens to add. 
"Please be brief." Wants to be the 
perfect -ecretary and travel. Hob- 
bies are foreign correspondence and 
collecting dolls. Just for a change, 
she dislikes men drivers. Activities 
include Bowling, 3 ; TennU, 1 ; Glee 
Club, 3 : Operetta, 3 : Room Agent 
for Mirror, 1. Her worst fault is 
eating. She doesn't know her best 
virtue. 



VIRGINIA L. CAMINITI 

("Jinny", "Cam") 

Business Course 

Collecting autographs of orchestra 
leaders is "Jinny's" hobby, while her 
ambition is to be a singer. She 
doesn't like homework and is apt to 
be stubborn. Activities include Senior 
Play Committee, Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Commercial Club, Baseball, 
Honor Roll. 



-Class of 1941 — ->*™>~>- — .>_.* 



CHESTER CARR 

Printing — Trade School 






EDWARD CHANDONAIT 

Civic Course 

"Punchy" is well known to all as 
one of the most capable members of 
the football squad and is active in 
many other sports. 



JOHN CYRUS CHAPMAN 

"Johnny" wants to be a chemical 
engineer and go to Tech or Texas. 
He enjoys hunting, fishing, and col- 
lecting phonograph records. Although 
he hasn't been here long "Johnny's 
activities already include the Dra- 
matic Club. In Ohio, he was vice- 
president of his class in his soph 
year, staff photographer of school 
publication — The Mirror, and was 
a member of the Glee Club, Choir, 
and "Hi-Y". Dislikes "These New 
England drivers." 



ELEANOR G. CHITTICK 

Her hobbies are skating and play- 
ing the piano and her nicknames vary 
fiom "Chicky" to "El". Wants to 
attend a teachers' college and later 
teach kindergarten. Activities in- 
clude Glee Club, "Naughty Mariet- 
ta," Candy Girl at Senior Play, 
Scatterbrains, S. J. H. Alumni Dance 
Committee. 



ESTHER MIRIAM COHEN 

Teacher's College Course 

"Dolly's" ambition is to be a nurse. 
Dislikes dripping water, but enjoys 
seeing people smile. Perhaps this ac- 
counts for her best virtue, keeping 
her temper. Activities include Senior 
Play, and Dramatic Club, 2, 3. Rob 
Hope, 9 :20 Club, and dancing are 
outside interests. Westbrook Junior 
College is Esther's destination. 




RORERT FRANCIS CASWELL 

("Doc", "Cas", "Rob") 

Rusiness Course 

Frequently says "Get out! I don't 
know anything." Expects to work in 
an office or join the navy. Ambition 
is to hold a high executive position. 
Hobby is all sports. Member of the 
Commercial Club and Honor Roll, !. 
2, 3. Likes women ; 9 :20 Club ; Lone 
Ranger. 



PRISCILLA CHAPIN 
("Pussy", "Cill") 

Business Course 

Pussy likes to sail and say, "Oh 
joy". She plans to go to Lasell after 
high school. Considers her worst 
fault being late, and her best virtue 
her brains. Commercial and Dramatic 
Clubs have the pleasure of her mem- 
bership. 



LILLIAN RITA CHIASSON 

Clerical Course 

"Lil" has the interesting hobby of 
collecting love letters. She also likes 
skating, and people with good man- 
ners and a sense of humor. Her des- 
tination is Texas, to cook for the 
Army boys. Her ambition is to be 
married. She dislikes clashing colors 
and is often heard to say, "Did you 
hear the latest?" 



JOHN R. CLARK ("Bud") 

Business Course 

Favorite expression is "That's no 
lie." Hopes to take a trip around 
the world with "Red" Merklee and 
later to become a professor at Wel- 
lesley College. Collects old nuts and 
bolts. Commercial Club Auditor, 3 ; 
Nominating Committee, 1, 3; Honor 
Roll, 1, 2, 3. Likes 9:20 Club, Rob 
Hope, and to kid women. Worst 
fault is going to sleep anywhere. 



SARAH MARY COLLETTO 

College Course 

"Don't be silly," says "Sadie" 
when a foolish question comes her 
way. Her ambition is to become a 
teacher and then to travel. Her des- 
tination is B. U. Liberal Arts, and 
then Radcliffe. Resides collecting 
post-cards and playing piano, Sadie 
likes chocolate cake, skating and 
swimming. 



Class of 1941 



V 



JEAN CATHERINE COLLIGAN 

Business Course 

Smitty's ambition is to learn to fly 
an airplane, which will undoubtedly 
take her to her destination, Hawaii. 
"Eek!" says she when seeing that 
delicious marshmallow sundae placed 
before her. Smitty dislikes Debs, but 
likes laughing at Lienchy's jokes, 
Glenn Miller, and agreeable people. 



DORIS ESTHER CORMIER 

Business Course 

They call her "Frenchy," or 
"Shorty," and wonder where on earth 
she got that giggle. Dancing just 
comes natural. "No kidding?" is her 
pet expression. She's a member of 
the Commercial Club ; likes Glenn 
Miller. Always returns things she 
borrows. 



MURIEL RITA COX 

("Coxie," "Muna") 

College Course 

Muna's ambition is to grow three 
inches, perhaps so she can reach the 
pedals when she plays her piano. 
She also hopes some day to be a 
graduate of Regis College. She dis- 
likes snobbish people, but has a soft 
spot for Bob Hope and Johnny Long, 
the lucky boys. Activities : Glee 
Club, Executive of Dramatic Club, 
Senior Dance Committee, and Dra- 
matic Club. 




GENNARO J. DAGOSTINO 

Civic Course 

"Jerry's" ambition is to see the 
world with the U. S-. Navy. He en- 
joys the movies, swimming, and pho- 
tography, but dislikes physics. Glenn 
Miller is his favorite orchestra leader 
and he likes to listen to him on the 
radio. 



ROSARIO N. D'ARGENTO 

Teachers' College Course 

Hobby is collecting records. His 
ambition is to be a pharmacist. Nick 
names are "Red," "Ro," and 
"Punky." Frequently remarks "Hit 
the road" or "It ain't hay". Likes 
Football, Baseball, Softball,. Hockey 
and Track and would like to see 
Walnut A. C. Club go undefeated. 
Mirror Room Agent, 1. 




SALVINA A. COLLURA 

("Babs," "Sally," "Babina"; 

Business Course 

"Babs' " destination is a job, par- 
ticularly that of a C. P. A. Her 
worst fault is talking too much ; 
homework and tests are her bug-a-boo. 
Movies and Bob Hope provide her 
entertainment, while her activities in- 
clude Commercial Club and Honor 
Roll, 2. 



GEORGE A. COX ("Coxie," 
"Peewee") 
Business Accounting Course 
Wants to work and go to school 
at night in order to become an execu- 
tive. Hobbies are stamp collecting 
and photography. Member of the 
Commercial Club ; Auditor of Senior 
Class: and Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. 
I. ikes to eat and sleep, Lux Radio 
Theatre, hockey games. Is honest. 



RUTH CREVOSHAY 

College Course 

"Crevie" often says ."Isn't it a 
lovely day?" Her ambition is to 
get her driving license. Some of her 
activities are Basketball, 2, 3; Vollev 
Ball, 2. 3; Baseball, Hockey, Arch- 
ery, 1 : Bowling, 1. Hobby is reading 
and destination is to be a nurse. 



MARIE GRETA DAMORTE 

Business Course 

Marie, future successful stenogra- 
pher, is forever exclaiming "wonder- 
ful!" Skippy belongs to the Com- 
mercial Club. She likes Bing Crosby, 
blondes, and the rhumba. Patient, 
but flares up at red hair. 



JAMES EDWARD DARLING 

Practical Arts Course 

James is known under the various 
titles of "Bud," "Jim," "Gene," and 
"Krupa" ; many of them due in part 
for his activities in the band for his 
three years in school. He also be- 
longed to the orchestra in 1939-40-41. 
"Jim" has a distinctive favorite ex- 
pression. It is, 2164; what's yours?" 
His ambitions lie along nautical lines, 
and his one wish is to be something 
in the navy. James' pet peeve is 
waiting for dates. 



-Class of 1941- — * — — — — — 



STEPHEN J. DEFINO ("Duke") 

Practical Arts Course 

Frequently says "Great balls afire." 
Expects to look for work and find 
himself a girl-friend while on the way 
to success. Collects stamps and reads 
books. Dislikes flirts, saucy women, 
and "high hat" people. Likes the 
9:10 Club. Worst fault is being eas- 
ily discouraged. Best virtue is good- 
heartedness. 



RAYMOND J. DELOREY 

("Diggs," "The Head," "The 
Turk") 
Civic Course 

Ambition is to become a machinist. 
His favorite expression is "Good 
morning, teacher." He likes Jimmy 
Dorsey's orchestra and "Mr. District 
Attorney." His many activities in- 
clude Sophomore and Junior Nomi- 
nating Committees, Mirror Agent, 
Senior Dance Committee, and Foot- 
ball. Wiggling his ears is his special 
mannerism. 



MARY HELEN DeMEO 

Practical Arts Course 

"Dem" can be heard saying "Mary 
here today?" almost all the time. 
Her interesting hobby, a foreign cor- 
respondent, leads to her ambition, to 
visit the person to whom she writes. 
Her destination is business school. 
She likes Artie Shaw playing Fren- 
issi. singing, and clever people. 
Mary herself possesses the prized 
virtue of alertness. 



JOSEPH W. DENAULT 

("Joe", "Red", "The Voice") 

Civic Course 

Hopes to take a course in news- 
paper reporting and then become a 
reporter. His pet expression is "Call 
Wal. 5198-W." His likes include 
Chop Suey Sandwiches and blondes. 
His worst fault is falling asleep and 
his best accomplishment is arguing. 



JOSEPH P. 

Welding — 

c. c. 



DeSISTO 

Trade School 




EMILIA LAURETTA 
DELLEPIGNE 

Business Course 

Millie is on her way to be a news- 
paper reporter, and, when her ship 
comes in, to go to Hawaii. Right 
now she collects cards and letters, 
and spends time teaching "Buddy", 
her dog, tricks. Member of the Com- 
mercial Club ; dislikes book-keeping 
tests. 



EDWARD L. DEMARAIS 

College Course 

"Wings" is all that his nickname 
indicates. A popular athletic, Eddie 
participated in Football in '39-'40 ; 
Basketball, '39-'40-'41 ; Track, '40-1 ; 
and Golf, '40-1. As you probably 
suspect, his hobby is athletics, as 
well as his ambition — to become a 
teacher of physical training. Edward's 
dislike is pushing Boisvert's car, and 
he likes eating in the cafeteria. He 
likes the Lux Radio Theatre and his 
worst fault is blushing. Eddie, was 
a Mirror Room Agent in 1939-40, and 
a member of the Nominating Commit- 
tee in 1939-40. 

ROSE PATRICIA DEMEO 

Business Course 

"Sharpy", fond of dancing, and in- 
cidentally pin curls, collects auto- 
graphs from famous orchestras. Her 
destination is the South Sea Islands 
with P. R. Is in Commercial Club. 
Confesses she's stubborn, and likes 
Club. 



MARY ANN DePHILLIPS 

Business Course 

"Benny" likes Major Bowes, Kay 
Kyser, sports, and Bonnie Baker but 
she dislikes oral compositions and 
having her picture taken. Her activ- 
ities include the Commercial Club 
and the Junior Lodge. Her worst 
fault is being impatient and she of- 
ten asks, "Who knows." 



V PAULINE ELIZABETH DICKS 

Clerical Course 

"Polly" or "Dixie" as she is some- 
times called, likes writing letters an<7 
Glenn Miller. Her activities are the 
Commercial Club, Dramatic Club, 
Scatterbrain Club, the chorus of the 
Operetta, and holding the fort with 
Pat and Peggy at Peggy's camp. 
Her worst fault is never being on 
time for anything, and she dislikes 
snobbish girls. Her favorite expres- 
sion is "Hello, dear." (to whom 1 ?) 









IGNATIUS E. DiLORENZO 

("Iggy," "Ernie") 

Business Course 

Commercial Club member as well 
as a plain, behaving student of W. 
H. S. Likes reading and the "Al- 
drich Family." Worst fault is sleep- 
ing. Destination is Northeastern 
Business School after which he hopes 
to become a successful business man. 
Hobbies are song-writing and collect- 
ing old coins. Favorite expression is 
"The early bird catches the world." 



SUMNER R. DOLBER 

Technical Course 

"Bud's" ambition is to be an of- 
ficer in the coast guard. Naturally, 
he plans to go to the U. S. Coast 
Guard Academy. His hobby is rifle 
shooting. Among his worst dislikes 
are Wednesdays and homework pil- 
fe:ers. His best virtue he thinks is 
keeping his shoes shined. "Ja wohl" 
and "You'll find the German on my 
desk" are his pet expressions. He 
has been active as Advertising Man- 
ager of the Mirror, Usher for Class 
Day and Graduation, and also as a 
band member. 

MARION FRANCES DORR 

Business Course 

Marion is a quiet W. H. S. girl. 
SI.e is the kind who spends her time 
at the movies. Her hobby is driving, 
and she is active in the Commercial 
Club. 



VIRGINIA E. DOUCETT 

Business Course 

Ginny, ardent movie-goer, wants to 
be a secretary for a while, get mar- 
ried, and go to Hawaii on her honey- 
moon. On the Senior Dance Com- 
mittee and Vice-President of the Com- 
mercial Club. Always on time for 
dates. 



LAWRENCE A. DOYLE 

Business Machines Course 

"Larry" plans to go south and be- 
come a professional golfer. He 
should, after his golf showing in 
school. Collecting autographs and 
making model airplanes are his pet 
hobbies. Dislikes home work and 
lending nickels to Adams. "Lipsky's" 
activities include Golf team, 1, 2, 3 ; 
Basketball team, '40-41 ; Polo, 1 ; 
Ping Pong, 2 ; LaCrosse, 2, 3 ; Com- 
mercial Club. 




JOHN R. DOHERTY ("Jack") 

Civic Course 

Ambition is to see the world. His 
favorite expression is "Watch it! 
His destination is uncertain, but he 
intends to work hard. He dislikes 
loud, noisy people. 



MARGUERITE ANN 
DONNELLY 

Special Course 

"Margi" intends to be an elemen- 
tary school teacher. Her destination 
is Framingham State Teachers' Col- 
lege. Often says "Wait 'til you hear 
this!" Activities include Assistant 
Exchange Editor of Mirror, 2 ; Ex- 
change Editor of Mirror, 3 ; Honor 
Roll, 3; all sports every year. Well 
kept nails is pet like while getting 
"kids" lunch is pet peeve. 



JANE PAULINE DORVAL 

Business Course 

Jane, determined to be a successful 
business woman, is going to visit a 
great-aunt in South Africa. Bunny 
strums a mandolin and goes in for 
sports. Often confides, "I think I 
forgot something." In the Commercial 
Club ; likes Sherlock Holmes ; prides 
herself on being a good listener. 



PEARL M. DOUGHERTY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Bunny's" ambition is either to go 
to dramatic school or do social work. 
Likes rain and mocha frappes, but 
dislikes sodas and Lab. period. One 
of her pet dislikes is being called by 
her middle name by Mr. Hodge. Ac- 
tivities include Sophomore Nominat- 
ing Committee, Dramatic Club, 
Alumni Dance Committee (South 
Junior, Honor Roll, 1, and Basket- 
ball. 



NORMAN E. DUBE ("Ned") 

Business Course 

Destination is a position in an of- 
fice or the army. Hopes to become 
an executive. Favorite expression is 
"I was scuttled." Hobby is watch 
repairing. Worst fault is being 
"broke." Best virtue is being on 
time. Likes 9:20 Club, to sleep, and 
to eat. 






. , ™->— — < Class of 1 94 1 * — > 



JOSEPH DANIEL DUGGAN 

("Joe") 

Business Course 

Favorite expression is "How much 
are you holding?" Worst fault is 
talking too much. Member of Com- 
mercial Club. Hopes to be a success 
in whatever he does. 



PATRICIA ANN DWYER 

Business Course 

"Oh heck!" exclaims our pretty 
blonde Pat whenever her typewriter 
key skips a space. Her ambition is to 
be a good stenographer, but Pat also 
likes to spend her time drawing or par- 
ticipating in sports. Her destination 
is Alaska or Washington, D. C. with 
Benny, and her activities include the 
Commercial Club and the Honor Roll. 
Pat likes Glenn Miller's Sunrise 
Serenade, dogs, blueberries and cream, 
and tall people. She says that her 
worst fault is getting into trouble, 
and her best virtue is getting out cf 
trouble. 

MILDRED B. EDWARDSON 

Technical Course 

To become an architect is "Mid- 
dy's" ambition. She would undoubt- 
edly term pineapple sundaes "smooth." 
Her destination is to enter Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology 
("Tech" to us). Activities include 
Senior Photograph Committee, Senior 
Play, Dramatic Club, 3 ; and Liter- 
ary Committee of Mirror, I, 2, 3. 



ELIZABETH JANE EVELER 

Teachers' College Course 

"Betty" has the ambition to be a 
nurse and to attend the Cambridge 
Hcspital School of Nursing. She is 
greatly interested in dramatics, being 
secretary of the Dramatic Club, 
prompter of the Dramatic Club plays 
(1941), and coach of the monthly 
meeting one-act play. She also was 
in the operetta. Betty also belongs 
to the N. W. V. Club. Her best 
virtues are her generosity and sin- 
cerity. She is often heard saying 
"I'm a lookin ! " 



OSCAR FALLING 

College Course 

Well — "Ozzie" hopes to be a bank- 
er. Guess it runs in the family. 
Destination is Dartmouth. His ac- 
tivities include Literary Staff; Chair- 
man of Junior Prom ; Sophomore 
Dance Committee ; Senior Dance Com- 
mittee ; Track Team; Vice-President; 
and North Junior Alumni. His fa- 

•orite expression is "Hey Beans! 

Third finger, left hand." Worst 
fault, never getting haircuts, and 
best virtue is spending money. 




DOROTHY R. DUNKLEE 

("Boots", "Sunshine," "Dotty," 
"Dot.") 

Business Course 

"Boots's" ambition is to excel in 
music and to find a good position. 
She often loses her temper but likes 
helping people who need sunshine. 
Her hobbies are Cooking, Bowling 
and Tennis. Activities are South 
Junior Alumnae, Archery, Basketball, 
Commercial Club. and "Young 
April." 



PAULINE EATON ("Polly") 

Special Course 

Polly's ambition is to see the world 
after she goes to college. Perhaps 
she will be seen driving around China 
with a "bolster" in her hand. Movies, 
magazines. and the Lux Radio 
Theatre are her pet likes. Activities : 
Dramatic Club, Senior Dance Com- 
mittee, Honor Roll, 1, 3; Hockey, 
and Archery. 



ROBERT W. ELDER 

Technical Course 

Bob is of a nautical turn of mind 
since he plans to go to either the 
Waverly Naval Academy or the 
Massachusetts Nautical School. We 
suggest the latter! Lists Lowell's 
essays as his chief dislike. Enjoys 
whistling, chewing gum, quiz pro- 
grams and P'riday night shows. 



GLENN J. ENMAN 

Practical Arts Course 

Glenn, known by such names as 
"Gay," "Gennie," and "Butch," 
hopes to go to nursing school and 
then become a nurse. Her pet ex- 
pression is "Good Night!" Likes 
having the crowd at home but dis- 
likes waiting for anyone. Tapping 
her fingernails on her desk is her 
special mannerism. 



AMEDEO J. FALZONE 

Practical Arts Course 

When anyone gets sick its "Mud- 
dy" who lends his car. He has been 
very active in school affairs and is a 
member of the famous Waltham High 
Football team. 



o—o — — «— *Class of 1941 






/ 



MARY ADRIENNE FERRELLI 

("Pappi," "Speed") 

Business Course 

Destination is Texas. Ambition is 
to become the leading star in a chorus 
show. Hobby is collecting knick- 
knacks, spoons, and menus. Member 
of Commercial Club. Dislikes the 
color green, being called "Doggie," 
and quiet people. Best virtue is 
smiling when things go wrong. Radio 
favorite is Jimmy Dorsey. Worst 
fault is talking too much. 



IRENE F. FERRIS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Renie" wants to be a nurse and 
plans to enter a nurses training school 
— often says T don't get it!" — col- 
lecting novel pins and sleeping are 
her hobbies — pet likes are talking 
over the phone and drinking cokes — 
activities include Dramatic Club, 
Basketball, 1 ; Scatterbrain Club. 



ROY FLETT 

Technical Course 

The only "ear bender" Roy likes 
is Fibber McGee. His other likes are 
his pipe, sports and "Little Yankees." 
His ambition : to get where he is go- 
ing (Waverley Naval Academy) in a 
hurry. Claims he doesn't have any 
other activities. 



ERNEST T. FRARY 

Civic Course 

Activities : Class Vice-President, 1 ; 
Football, '37, '38, '39, Hockey, '38, 
'39, Track, '38 ; Captain, '39 ; Junior 
Prom Committee, '39; "Ernie" or 
"Bud" intends to stay in the army 
for a while and then get a Civil 
Service job. Pet like is eating and 
sleeping and often asks "How soon's 
mess?" Best virtue is writing let- 
ters and pet dislike is reveille (5:30 
A. M.) 



HOWARD LEONARD GADBOYS 

College Course 

In Howard we find a serious- 
minded, yet thoroughly pleasant fu- 
ture "M. D." Yes, his destination 
is the Harvard Medical School. 
Swing music is his relaxation, with 
Charlie Barnet his favorite orchestra 
leader. He also likes jam sessions, 
and does not care for Horace Heidt. 
Howard's activities included the Lit- 
erary Staff, Mirror, 1939-40, and Hu- 
mor Editor of Mirror, 1940-41. Nick- 
named Joe, Howard's favorite ex- 
pression is "But Mr. Ward — but — 
but — but — !" 




GEORGE H. FERRIS 

Business Course 

"Speed" wants to be successful is 
whatever he does, but is always say 
ing the wrong thing. He enjoys Kay 
Kyser, eating, and sleeping. People 
who always argue pe*ve him. 



ELIZABETH G. FINAN 

Special Course 

Betty is going in training at St 
Elizabeth's Hospital after graduation. 
"You know what, kids" is a favorite 
expression of "Finnin." She hates 
to be kept waiting. Activities in- 
clude Sophomore Dance Committee ; 
Mirror Room Agent; Hockey, 1, 2, 3; 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Volleyball, 1, 2. 
3; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Tennis, 1, 2, 3; 
and Archery, 2, 3. 



MARY PHYLLIS FORSTER 

Business Machines Course 

"Tia's" one ambition is to travel 
to California in a trailer. Destination 
is a business school. Her worst 
fault is staying out late and eating. 
She likes guards and good dancers. 
Also enjoys Kay Kyser. She is a 
member of the Commercial Club. 
Her pet expression is "What-a- 1 a- 
know, Joe?" 



CATHERINE MARY FREEMAN 
("Kay," "Cathy") 

Business Course 

Would like to see the world on a 
bicycle built for two. Hobby is writ- 
ing letters to that certain person. 
Member of Commercial Club. Often 
says, "To be sure," "H'm, who 
knows?" Likes swimming, skating, 
dancing, and getting lost. Dislikes 
being called "Kate" and "Katy". 
On the radio her choice is "Fibber 
McGee." Best virtue is a good dis- 
position. 



INO GERALDINE GALLANT 

Practical Arts Course 

New England Conservatory of Mu- 
sic is Ina's destination, while her 
ambition is to have an all male 
band. "Honey" likes to stay in bed, 
dislikes hard work and enjoys Kay 
Kyser. Favorite expression is "Who 
do you think you're kidding?" Col- 
lects souvenirs. 



-Class of 1941" 



KOGER GAL'DET ("Snook") 

Business Course 

Hopes to get a good "job" and to 
become a band leader. Saves pic- 
tures of orchestra leaders. Favorite 
expression is "I don't know." Likes 
his dog "Tinv," Glenn Miller, the 
9:20 Club, Baseball, Football, Bas- 
ketball, and tapping on desks with 
his pencil to th; rhythm of songs. 



FLORA GERRISH 

Practical Arts Course 

"Flo" would like to be able to 
cook and sew well, although her am- 
bition is to be able to work at any- 
thing. She makes her own dress pat- 
terns as well as dresses and likes to 
collect post cards. One of Flora's 
worst faults is being frank and say- 
ing exactly what she thinks. 



LOUISE M. GIMINARDA 

Business Course 

Jimmy, future private secretary, 
likes reading movie columns, listen- 
ing to Artie Shaw's "Frenesi." She's 
on the Advertising Staff of the Mir- 
ror and of the Senior Play. 



ROBERT WILLIAM GLASGOW 



KENNETH C. GRANT ("Ken," 
"Kenny") 

Practical Arts Course 

Destination is the Vesper George 
Art School with the ambition to be- 
come a commercial artist. Hobbies 
are drawing and printing. Member 
of band for three years. Likes the 
9 :20 Club, to draw, and to letter. 




ALICE R. GAUTHIE'R 

Business Course 

Alice would like to travel to the 
South Seas. She enjoys Roller Skat- 
ing, Canoeing, Movies, Opera and 
Ice Follies. Dislikes homework (of 
course.) Keeping secrets is her best 
virtue. To obtain a secretarial po- 
sition and attend Wilfred Academy 
are her two highly prized ambitions. 
Activities include: Hockey, ' 38-39: 
Archery, '39-40; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3, 
4; Commercial Club, '40-41. 



ROBERT A. GIBSON 

Practical Arts Course 

"Gibby" wants to go to art school, 
preferably abroad. He likes records, 
movies, Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, 
and a certain red head. High ambi- 
tions is his best virtue. "Bee-oo-tiful" 
is his favorite expression. His special 
mannerism is continually snapping his 
fingers. 



VINCENT GIMINARDA ("Jim") 

Business Course 

Ambition is to become a pilot. Ac- 
tivities include Commercial Club and 
Senior Play Committee. Expects tc 
work, then go back to school. Worst 
fault is being lazy. Best virtue is 
minding his own business. Favorite 
expression is "What are you doing 
tonight?" Hobby is collecting old 
stamps and coins. Favorite programs 
are 9 :20 Club and "I Love a Mys- 
tery." 



GORDON T. GOODRICH 

("Gordie," "G. G.") 

Practical Arts Course 

Frequently says "That's all the 
quarts, Charlie." Hobbies are draw- 
ing, Baseball, and Horseracing. Des- 
tination is U. T. C. and ambition is 
to live long enough to see the Red 
Sox win the pennant. Writes with 
pencils that need sharpening. Is 
prompt and notices things. Dislikes 
getting up early, lending pencils, and 
candy. Likes chocolate pudding, ice 
cream, and Glenn Miller. 



RUTH GREENE 

Business Course 

Ruth is aiming quite high because 
her ambition is to get accepted at 
Harvard College. Her destination is 
"obvious to acquaintances," and her 
activities include Chairman of Senior 
Play! Literary Chairman of Mirror: 
Honorary member of Commercial 
Club. Likes Russian literature, 

blondes, good music. Dislikes pseudo- 
sophisticates. 



* — ~m«» — Class of 1941- 



JEANNETTE R. GRINNELL 
("Ginger") 

Business Course 

To become a secretary is Ginger's 
ambition and her favorite hobby is 
writing letters. She likes dancing, 
bowling and horseback riding — but 
not men! Her best virtue is being 
frank. Activities include the Com- 
mercial Club and Honor Roll, 2. 



RICHARD H. HAGUE 

Practical Arts Course 

Likes pineapple sundaes and re- 
hearsing the love scene in the Senior 
Play. "Dick," "Ha-goo" or "Ha- 
gerey," as he is called, wants to be- 
come a music supervisor in a large 
city. Activities include W. H. S. 
Band and Orchestra, 1, 2, 3; Senior 
Dance Committee, Senior Play and 
sports. Plays trumpet in a dance 
band for a hobby. Likes bright 
clothes and red stockings. Often 
says "Is that right" or "Can you 
imagine that." 



JAMES PRANK HART 

Practical Arts Course 



ROBERT EMMET HEALY 

College Course 

Active on the Literary Staff of 
Mirror for three years. Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3; Dramatic Club, 1, 2, 3; 
President of Dramatic Club, 3 : 
Senior Play Committee, Dramatic 
Club Plays 2, 3 ; Class Day and 
Graduation Usher 2, Senior Play 
Cast ; and Operetta Cast, 3. These are 
some of "Bob's" very many extra- 
curricula doings in the school. His 
ambition to be a success certainly 
looks like a safe guess. Music is 
Bob's hobby and Boston College his 
destination. He dislikes over-painted 
and pseudo-sophisticated young women 
and likes to eat. His worst fault is 
not getting enough sleep ( ! ) and his 
best virtue is being systematic. 



RAYMOND 

Printing — 



J. HENDRICKEN 

Trade School 




ARTHUR R. HAGEN 

Civics Course 

Art's favorite expression is "Hi 
Bud." He likes skiing. Lux Radio, 
9:20 Club and Bob Hope. Playing 
golf and horseback riding are two 
hobbies that keep him well occupied. 
To join the navy and become a chief 
petty officer is his ambition. On golf 
team 1940-41. 



ELAINE HOPE HARNISH 

College Course 

Only ambitious people like Elaine 
would sometime want to write a book. 
"Snooks" also adds, "So there!" She 
has been active on the Mirror staff, 
on the Senior Play Committee, Op- 
eretta cast, Glee Club, Dramatic 
Club, and Orchestra, 1. She is also 
an Honor student. Her hobby, writ- 
ing letters. Elaine also likes to re- 
ceive letters and listen to the Lux 
Radio Theatre and Fred Warring's 
orchestra. Her best virtue is being 
precise. 



LUCILLE ANN HATCH ("Sarge") 

Commercial Course 

Peggy would like to join the army 
because she enjoys army life and likes 
horseback riding. She might join the 
ski troops, too, because that winter 
sport is one of her favorites. May- 
be if she does enlist they'll break her 
of toeing-in and promiscuously pow- 
dering her nose. Activities: Com- 
mercial Club; Dramatic Club, N. J. 
Alumni, Swimming Team. 



THOMAS R. HEASLIP ("Chuck," 
"Stretch") 

Business Course 

Frequent expression is "Saaay." 
Expects to go down Argentine Way 
on his trip around the world and to 
become a good secretary. President 
of Commercial Club and Honor Roll, 
1, 2, 3. Favorite radio program is 
"Bob Hope." Worst fault is find- 
ing something to do. Hobby is eat- 
ing between meals. 



NORINE MARIE HENRY 

Practical Arts Course 

"What's new?" and "No kidding!" 
are the pet expressions of "Hank." 
She plans to enter the Cambridge 
School of Nursing. Likes potato 
chips and hamburgers. Listening to 
Bob Hope, walking and music are 
her hobbies. Dramatic Club, 2, 3; 
Baseball, Basketball and Volleyball 
make up Norine's activities. 






IRENE JOSEPHINE HIGGINS 

Business Course 

"Higgie" likes people with a sense 
of humor and dislikes snobbish girls. 
Her worst fault is not doing her 
homework at home. "Rene" wants 
to be a great violin player. The 
chances are she will be. Her activ- 
ities include : Commercial Club, Glee 
Club, and Orchestra of which she is 
the Concert Mistress. Her favorite 
expression is, "You ain't lyin' ! " 



BARBARA DEERING HII 

College Course 

"Barb's" hobby is daydreaming 
and her favorite expression, "That's 
attractive." Confesses her worst fault 
is being sarcastic and that calories 
and jealousy annoy her. Kathleen 
Dell's is her destination. "Snookie's" 
activities include Dramatic Club, 1, 
2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2; N. J. H. 
Alumni Dance, 3 ; Sr. Photographic 
Committee. 3 ; ; Sr. Play, 3 ; Literary 
Staff of Mirror, 2 ; Humor Editor of 
Mirror, 2 ; Executive Board of Dra- 
matic Club, 3; Cat Club, 2, 3; N. 
W. V. Club, 3; and Dramatic Club 
Play, 3. 



ELEANOR M. HUGHES 

Practical Arts Course 

Nicknames are "El," "Lolly," and 
"Bimbo" — often says "Haven't got 
the slightest" — Intends to be a 
navy nurse — goes to Newport, R. I. 
as a hobby — Likes strawberry cokes 
and 9:20 Club — Dislikes people that 
say "so what" — pet vanity is her 
fingernails. 



JOHN JOSEPH HURLEY 

Civic Course 

J. J. Hurley, affectionately 
"Hurker," has been active in — 
just plain active. 



called 
well, 



DORIS ELAINE JACOBS 

Business Course 

Dodo dashes through all the sports, 
and comes out on top. Loves little 
dogs, (not hot dogs). She'll work, 
and then travel for a time. Mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club, and on 
Nominating Committee, 1, 2. Likes 
9:20 Club, and munching between 
meals. 




SHIRLEY R. HIGGINS 

Business Machines 

"Honest!" exclaims "Shirl" when 
trying to emphasize a point. Treas- 
urer of the Senior Class, Shirl's other 
activities include Commercial Club, 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Nominating Com- 
mittee, 2, 3 ; and she was also Secre- 
tary- Treasurer in her Junior year. 
Her ambition is to secure a good of- 
fice position. Her hobbies include 
basketball and dancing. Hawaii is 
Shirl's destination, and she says that 
her pet like is waiting for Squeaky. 
Her favorite program is the ever- 
popular 9 :20 Club. Her best virtue 
is getting along with others. 



VIRGINIA MAY HOWSON 

Practical Arts Course 

"Ginger" plans to attend a music 
college and then become a music 
teacher. Belongs to the Merry-Go- 
Round Club. Enjoys dancing, col- 
lecting menus, Baby Snooks, and all 
sports. Dislikes W. H. S. Glamour 
girls and 9:20 Club. Pet expression 
is "Oh my goodness." Worst fault 
is talking in "studies." 



VIRGINIA MARY HUGHES 

Business Course 

Ginny aims to go "South of the 
Border," and stay there! She goes 
in for soorts, and the Commercial 
Club. We congratulate her on be- 
ing able to greet people cheerfully 
before 7 :30 A. M. Likes bangle 
bracelets and has to curb her sarcasm. 



ROBERT B. HYSLER ("Bob") 

Business Course 

To be a success after attending 
Mass. State is Bob's hope. A bona- 
fide sports addict, he collects base- 
ball players' pictures as a hobby and 
listens to the Sports Roundup. He 
is a member of the Commercial Club. 



MARION STEVENS JOHNSON 

Teachers' College Course 

"Johnny's" ambition is to become 
a good commercial artist after attend- 
ing Mass. School of Art. Dislikes 
to be kept waiting, which probably 
accounts for the expression "I don't 
see why". She likes taking candid 
pictures, navy blue, Johnny Long's 
orchestra, Xavier Cugat and Bob 
Hope Programs. Being good natured 
and having a grand personality may 
have a lot to do with Marion's vari- 
ous activities : Junior Prom Commit- 
tee, N. W. V.'s Club.N. J. Alum- 
nae Committee, Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; 
Glee Club, Operetta, 3; Bowling, 1, 
2, 3 : Basketball, 1 ; Archery, 1 ; 
Eield Hockey, 1 ; Cat's Club. 



* — ,~.,— *>— — .—..—<»— ><— «— ..-»«.— — -Class of 1941- — ■ • — ——«-»< 



RICHARD S. JOHNSON ("Dick") 

Business Course 

Hobbies are sports, driving cars, 
and collecting pictures. Activities in- 
clude Football, '40 ; and Honor Roll, 
2, 3. Expects to find a good job. 
Favorite radio program is 9:20 Club. 
Worst fault is arguing with Egghead 
Kelley. Ambition is to be a success 
in whatever he does. Pet like is 
driving cars. Favorite expressions are 
"I guess I told you," "You ain't 
ly'n'!" 



RICHARD L. KEENAN 

College Course 

Dick's ambition is to be a travel- 
ing salesman and after leaving High 
School he expects to enter Norwich 
University. Activities include Senior 
Play, Dramatic Club Secretary, 2; 
Dramatic Club, 2, 3; Mirror Room 
Agent, 3 ; Literary Committee, Mirror. 
Likes Mr. Ward's tactfulness and 
dislikes girls putting on make-up in 
public. 



WILLIAM B. KENNEDY ("Bill") 

Civic Course 

Ambition is to see the world with 
Doherty and Pendergast. He dis- 
likes noisy girls, but likes sensible 
people, Glenn Miller, and the Boston 
Bees. He frequently says, "Gee 
Whiz!" or "Yea, Brother!" Activ- 
ities : band (2 years). 



SAMUEL J. KERNS 

Business Course 

Activities : Soph. Social Committee, 
Junior Nominating Committee, Senior 
Dance Committee and Commercial 
Club. "Sam's" ambition is to be- 
come secretary to the president of 
the United States. His hobby is 
skiing. "Oh Magee" or "Say, George" 
are his favorite expressions and his 
worst fault. Best virtue and special 
mannerism is hanging around Dick 
O'Toole. 



IRENE MAY KILPATRICK 

("Patsy," "Chubby") 

Business Course 

Patsy claims that she's forgetful, 
but when it comes to baton twirling 
her memory never fails, nor her 
charm. Since she dislikes writing 
letters her chosen career of legal 
secretary (after secretarial school) 
will spare her the trouble of com- 
posing her own. Her pet mannerisms 
are blushing, wrinkling her nose, and 
saying "Well, gee." Activities: Com- 
mercial Club; Music Editor; Senior 
Dance Committee. 




MARY ANGEL KAKIS 

Teachers' College Course 
Mary wants to attend State Teachers' 
College and to teach in Waltham 
High. She likes music, dancing, 
chocolate sodas, and new clothes. 
Best virtue is honesty. Her activities 
include Dramatic Club, Bowling, 
Basketball, and Field Hockey. She 
is often heard saying "Pickles," 
"Fiddle-dee-dee" or "Ta-Ta." 



HELEN M. KELLEY 

Business Course 

Helen has not decided upon which 
of two ambitions she prefers. House- 
wife or bookkeeper. Her hobbies are 
collecting menus and junk jewelry. 
The 9 :20 club and biting her nails 
keep her busy. Likes boys with 
"wiffle" haircuts. She is a Commer- 
cial Club member. Her destination 
is some business school. 



PHYLLIS ELLEENE KEITH 

Special Course 

"George" will often be heard say- 
ing "Got a letter from Fred today." 
Her ambition is to be a fashion 
artist and attend the Modern School 
of Applied Arts. This undoubtedly 
accounts for her hobby of sketching. 
Silly girls are her pet dislikes while 
worst fault is gossiping. School ac- 
tivities include Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Senior Play Committee, Ten- 
nis, 1, 2, 3; Basketball, 3. 



VIRGINIA F. KEYES ("Gin," 
"Ginny," "Iccy") 

Special Course 

Favorite expression is "Oh, no, you 
don't!" Destination is the Kathleen 
Dell School with the ambition to be- 
come a dietitian. Hobbies are eating 
sweets, photography, hiking, and 
dancing. Member of Dramatic Club. 
Mirror Agent, Class Volley Ball 
team and Baseball team. Worst 
fault is leaving pencils in her hair. 
Likes "Tom Mix," 9:20 Club, 
"Rockv Road," and ice cream. 



LEONARD F. KING 

Civic Club 

Wants to own a chain of restau- 
rants. His hobby is any outdoor 
sport. Known as "Lenny" or 
"Shorty", his destination is Laconia, 
N. H., for very personal reasons. 



Class of 1941 



STEPHEN C. KOLODZIESKI 

Practical Arts Course 

Wants to be successful, probably 
in the navy. Known to his friends 
at "Steve", "Kay", or "Z.J.", his 
hobby is stamp collecting and his fa- 
vorite expression is "Almost fell 
thru the floor." In his spare time he 
likes to argue with others and his pet 
dislike is doing homework. 



MARGARET ML LALLY ("Irish") 

Stenographic Course 

Hopes to go to a higher secretarial 
school to become a stenographer. Fre- 
quently says "Sure?" Hobby is 
reading. Dislikes boastful people and 
sarcastic boys. Likes the radio an- 
nouncer on W. B. Z., sports, and 
good-natured people. Worst faults 
are arguing and being stubborn. Best 
virtue is her smile. Special manner- 
ism is fooling with her hair. Be- 
longs to Commercial Club. 



JUNE LEAVITT 

Business Course 

"Junie" awaits her chance to work 
up from a stenographer's position to 
that of a private secretary. Her hob- 
bies are movies and reading. Mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club who dis- 
likes bright red nails. Likes "Screen 
Guild," pink, hot dogs, and pretty 
clothes. 



DORA LEBLAXC 

Business Course 

She likes dancing, orchards, bowl- 
ing and spends the summer swimming 
and having a good time. She is an 
active member of t he Commercial 
Club. 



PETER J. LILLIS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Hey, kid" is his favorite expres- 
sion and keeping Bern out of trouble 
is his hobby. His destination is 
Stockbridge or the army. Best virtue, 
he thinks, is keeping Bern from 
Watertown. 




ALICE KOUYOUMJIAN 

College Course 

Her best virtue is being cheerful. 
She is consequently called "Giggles." 
Expects to enter Newton Hospital 
and train to be a nurse. Hobby is 
collecting records and "You ain't 
kiddin" is her favorite expression. 



GLADYS MARIE LAROSE 

Practical Arts Course 

"Gladie" likes sports, 9:20 Club, 
and dancing. "Think" is her motto, 
as it is also Mr. Hood's. She plans 
to go to work for a while, then to 
get married and live happily ever 
after. 



RUTH W. LEARY ("Woofy") 

Business Course 

Favorite expression is "Gee-Whiz — 
Really." Activities include Soph 
Social Committee ; Commercial Club ; 
Hockey, 1; Basketball, 1, 2, 3; Arch- 
ery, 1; Baseball, 1, 2, 3; Volley Ball. 
3. Wants to get a good position and 
then travel around the world by air- 
plane. Likes sports. Dislikes home- 
work, and to disagree. 



RALPH A. LIBBY 

Practical Arts Course 

Ambition is to enter some phase of 
aviation especially to enlist in Ca- 
nadian Air Force — "Superman" 
claims he's just a "home boy with- 
out activities of any importance," 
(modest lad, eh?) — Fond of most 
animals, plays trumpet, bowls and 
likes to say in an English accent 
"Are you there?" 



DORIS I. LIXDGREX 

Practical Arts Course 

"Do Do" plans to do bank work 
and wants to prepare at Higgins 
Machine School. She enjoys dancinf 
and is often heard saying "You'r'- 
kidding". Worst fault is getting L 
all kinds of trouble and best virtue 
is being good natured. 



*,_„_„ — . ,-~— <_, — Class of 1 94 1 ' — • * 



ELMER MURRAY LOGAN 

Practical Arts Course 

The capable chairman of the stage 
committee for the Senior Play says, 
"My ambition is to be a successful 
businessman and to have a name in 
art." And if his work in that com- 
mittee means anything, we are cer- 
tain that "Ray" will succeed. Other- 
wise known as "El", Elmer hopes to 
attend Bryant and Stratton Business 
School, but will also spend his 
leisure in doing sculpture and pho- 
tography work. Another of Ray's 
hobbies is collecting motion picture 
reels. "That's O. K., kid!" says 
Elmer when listening to either Glenn 
Miller or Artie Shaw. His other 
likes include tall brunettes, or did 
vcu say brunette, El 1 ?, and the old 
9:20 Club. His best virtue, states 
Elmer, is the absence of faults. 

FREDERICK W. LUNDY 

Practical Arts Course 

Expects to become a gas station 
attendant. Ambition is to own a gas 
station and become a mechanic. Fa- 
vorite expression is "Were you down 
last night?" Worst fault is talking 
too loudly. Special mannerisms are 
whistling and tapping on desks. Likes 
"Fibber McGee and Molly." 



ROBERT ALLISON LYONS 

Civic Course 

Known to all as "Al" he likes gals 
and most anything. 



JAMES EDWARD MACKAY 

("Buddy") 

Business Course 

Hobby is music — has leading role 
in High School Operetta, "Naughty 
Marietta." Member of Commercial 
Club. Likes "Dagwood and Blondie" 
— Hopes to own and operate his own 
business — Worst fault is sleeping 
until 7:30 — Expects, after leaving 
high school, to take a long needed 
vacation. 



DAVID CONRAD MacMILLAN 

Business Course 

"Could be!" says "Mac," as he 
pursues his hobby studying the trends 
in the stock market. His ambition 
is to succeed in the financial world 
and his activities include : Commercial 
Club, '40-41 ; Dramatic Club, 1940-41 ; 
Senior Play Cast, Naughty Marietta 
cast; also drum major in band. Mac 
likes drawing, skiing, movie-going, 
eating good food, and wearing nice 
clothes. 




RUSSELL T. LONG 

Teachers' College Course 

"Russ" dislikes gossiping and cadv 
girls — Destination is Boston Univer- 
sity — Bowling and sports are his 
hobbies. Worst fault is losing his 
wallet. His best virtue is being 
early. 



RUSSELL L. LONGLEY 

Teachers' College Course 

"Russ" (sometimes known as 
"Flash" or "Ace") intends to be a 
successful photographer and has had 
plenty of experience already. His 
activities number Football, 1 ; Soph. 
Grid Committee ; Photographer for 
Mirror, 2. 3 ; Dramatic Club, 2, 3 ; 
Senior Play, 1 ; Senior Photograph 
Committee. Often says "What d'ya 
say?" or "How's every little thing?" 
Hobbies are hunting and fishing in 
Maine, and more photography. 



WILLIAM MacDONALD 

"Toby" is another one who has 
been prominent in class affairs and 
athletics, having been captain of the 
basketball team, member of junior 
and senior Nominating Committees, 
and one of our illustrious football 
stars. 



AVIS M. MacKEIL 

Practical Arts Course 

"Avie" is another one who wants 
to be a registered nurse and after 
graduation wants to enter a nurse's 
training school. Often says, "No — 
really!" or "Nuts!" — Saves match 
covers and pictures for a hobby. — 
Likes all sports, especially skating, 
swimming, and bicycle riding. 



EVELYN M. MacLEOD ("Lyn", 
"Mac") 

Business Course 

Likes movies and Lux Radio and 
frequently says "Oh! Applesauce!" 
Lyn wants to succeed in whatever 
she does, and she also wants her own 
way. Her activities include Glee 
Club, Murray Club, choir and sports. 







JOHN S. MADDEN 

Practical Arts Course 

"It ain't hay" is his favorite ex- 
pression and playing bridge is his 
hcbby. "Hypo" expects to try for a 
Civil Service examination. He has 
been active as a cheer leader, 2, 3 ; 
chairman of Senior Dance Committee; 
and a member of Junior Nominating 
Committee : Junior Prom Committee 
and Senior Nominating Committee. 
Likes eating, but dislikes chemistry 
and home work. 



MARGARET ANN MAIN 

College Course 

"Definitely," says "Margie," as 
she tells of her ambitions to travel 
through the United States and Can- 
ada before she becomes a school 
teacher. Margie likes movies, draw- 
ing, collecting phonograph records, 
listening to Kay Kyser and "Those 
We Love." Her worst faults are 
not being prompt and being a spend 
thrift but she makes up for these by 
being helpful. 



HAROLD K. MALMGREN 

("Harry," "Swede") 

Soecial Course 

Frequently says "Hey. Boy." Des- 
tination is the navy. Hopes to be- 
long to the merchant marine. Hobby 
is going to the movies. 



WILLIAM F. MANNING 

College Course 

"Basher's" hobby is sports and his 
record of being captain of the foot- 
ball and baseball teams, and being a 
member of the W. H. S. Athletic 
Association proves it. He was also 
chairman of the Photograph Commit- 
tee. Bill wants to go to college or 
play "pro" baseball and become a 
director of Athletics at some high 
school. 



EDITH GERALDINE MANIACE 

rEdi," "Shortie") 

Business Course 

Hopes to become a bookkeeper, 
preferably in California — Hobbies 
are music, swimming, dancing, bowl- 
ing, and the radio where her favor- 
ites are Lux Theatre, Eddie Cantor, 
and Jack Benny — Often says, 
"You're not funny!" Dislikes get- 
ting up in front of class to give a 
speech — Activities include Commer- 
cial Club, N. J. Alumnae, and 
Honor Roll. Mannerism is saying, 
"Hurry up, Laura, we'll be late for 
class." 




ANTOINETTE T. MAFFEI 

Business Course 

"Toni", now scouting around for 
post cards, and looking forward to n 
secretarial position is a member of 
the Commercial, and C. W. N. Clubs. 
She harkens to swing music, especially 
Artis Shaw's, and the 9 :20 Club, and 
likes dancing and pretty clothes. Dis- 
likes homework and tests. 



FRANK L. MAIURI 

Practical Arts Course 

"Francis" wants to be a commer- 
cial artist, a druggist, or an electri- 
cian — not exactly fussy — likes 
traveling and not paying gas bills — 
dislikes ten year old jokes — never 
borrows or lends (over half a dol- 
lar) — taking Democracy in Room 
218, he confesses, is his worst fault. 



ALFRED ANTONINO MANDILE 

("Mandy", "Al") 
Business Course 
Expects to join the army or be 
drafted — Ambition is to be a chef 
in a European hotel — Favorite ex- 
pression is "Why, sure!" Special 
mannerism is saying "Excuse me." 
Member of Commercial Club — Hob- 
by is collecting photographs. Worst 
fault is being a money lender. 



CHARLES E. MANSFIELD 

Civic Course 

"That's all right,"' assures the 
"Cedarwood Menace", "You too, can 
be the life of the party." "Casanova" 
wants to be a second Bill Cunning- 
ham and after leaving High School 
hopes to go to Northeastern. Pleads 
guilty to the sin of cracking his 
knuckles and often wonders what his 
best virtue is. 



STEPHEN JOSEPH MARRELLA 

Business Course 

Ambition is to become a business 
manager. After leaving High School 
he intends to work in a grocery 
store. Favorite radio programs are : 
Glenn Miller, 9:20 Club, Jack 
Benny, and Fred Allen. 






ELOISE CAROLYN MARTELL 

Practical Arts Course 

Tilly has an ambition to enter an 
interior decorating school and become 
an interior decorator. She enjoys 
riding, dislikes hearing Alice saying 
"I can't" but likes saying "Well, for 
Pete's sake." Eloise has sewing as a 
hobby. 



PAUL LORING MAY ("Red") 

Practical Arts Course 

Red intends to go to Mass. State 
Agricultural College, which is a far 
cry from his ambition of owning a 
night club in Waltham. He likes 
"everything nice," to be more specific, 
Glenn Miller and brunettes. Ex- 
pression : "Be good now." Activities: 
Hockey, Tennis, Golf. 



WALTER McCUSKE'R ("Baldy", 
"Mucca", "Mac") 

Civic Course 

Hopes to go to Alabama or else 
go into the U. S. Army. His favorite 
expression is "It won't be long now." 
Defending the underdog is his best 
virtue. Activities, Baseball (2 years). 
Keeping Mansfield in his place is 
his hobby. 



FRANCIS J. McGOVERN (Bud", 
"Mac") 

Practical Arts Course 

Ambition is to try for a Civil Ser- 
vice position and be a success. Likes 
Fibber McGee and Molly, and also 
likes to eat. Homework bothers him. 
His pet phrase is "Gee Whiz!" 



PATRICIA E. McINTOSH 

Commercial Course 

Activities include Assistant Social 
Chairman of Commercial Club, Dra- 
matic Club, North Junior Alumni. 
"Pat" or "Mack" frequently says 
"Hi Honey — do it again". Her 
hobbies are amateur photography and, 
strange to say, writing letters. 
Likes skiing, horseback riding, travel- 
ing and swimming. 




ROBERT L. MARTIN 

Practical Arts Course 

His nicknames include "Crusher." 
"Molecule," "Jeep." "Dillinger" 
rnd, rather oddly, "Martin" — Am- 
bition is to be a famous typist and 
hobby is short wave radio work. — 
Will either take a typing examina- 
tion and get a job or join the army 
to be with his brother. 



MARGERY ANNE McCUSKER 

Special Course 

"Mac" or "Marge" has been a busy 
girl for she's been a Mirror Room 
Agent, played basketball, field 
hockey, volleyball, baseball, tennis, 
and been on Honor Roll. "Marge's" 
ambition is to get her license. Likes 
9:20 Club and Glenn Miller. "Hi, 
Gang" is pet expression. Collecting 
"Vic" records and postcards is her 
hobby. 



MARILYN JEAN McCABE 

Practical Arts Course 

Hot fudge sundaes and Johnny 
Long's orchestra appeal to "Mickey." 
Ambition is to be an air hostess. 
Cambridge School of Nursing is her 
destination. "Hi ya handsome" is 
pet expression while special manner- 
ism is sitting on feet during class. 
Activities include Dramatic Club, 
Junior Nominating Committee, all 
sports, and N. W. V. Club. Hob- 
bies are driving and dancing. 



MURIEL LOUISE McGUIGAN 

Business Course 

Likes horse-back riding, bowling, 
tennis, and skating. Active in the 
Commercal Club. Muriel is one of 
the most talkative pupils in school. 



ROBERT EDWARD McKENNA 

College Course 

"Mack" wants to "See the world — 
(around Waltham)". That's quite 
an ambition, Mack! A member of 
Dramatic Club in 1941, Robert says. 
"I like 'I Love a Mystery'." And 
that's all he'll say. 



Class of 1941 — -* — -■* 



GEORGE A. MERKLEE 

Business Course 

He likes the 9:20 Club, Friday 
rights, and sleeping, and naturally 
dislikes homework. His activities 
are reading and the Commercial 
Club. He hopes to go around the 
world with Clarky some day. 



ROSE M. MELE 

Business Course 

"Shorty'' enjoys dancing and the 
9:20 Club. Dislikes getting up in the 
morning. Her worst fault is being 
stubborn, but makes up for this in 
her best virtue which is being happy. 
Her hobby is foreign correspondents. 
Also a Commercial Club member. 



ANDREW G. MEYER 

College Course 

Hails all with a hearty "How are 
you this fine and glorious day?" 
"Andy's" hobbies are reading and 
swimming. Lemon meringue pie and 
doughnuts will keep him happy any 
day. Activities include Nominating 
Committee. 2, 3 ; Class Auditor, 1 ; 
Class Secretary-Treasurer, 2; Dra- 
matic Club, 3 ; and Editor-in-Chief 
of the Mirror. Destination is Har- 
vard. 



JOHN R. MIXON ("Red") 

Business Course 

Favorite expression is "I don't 
know." Destination is a business col- 
lege (Bentley's). Ambition is to be- 
come an executive and to be success- 
ful in what he does. Hobby is 
watching basketball games. Belongs 
fo the Senior Band. Likes chop 
suey and Fibber McGee and Molly. 








NATALIE M. MOLLICA 

Wants to be a nurse and lists her 
hobbies as driving, swimming, and 
skating. Nicknamed "Nan" or "Nat". 
Her activities include Dramatic Club, 
2, 3 : Advertising Committee of Seni- 
or Play. Basketball. Volleyball, 1 ; 
and Tennis, 1. Favorite expression 
is "Can you imagine that!" Likes 
riding in open cars in the summer, 
movies, square dances, and mocha 
ice cream cones. 




MORTON MILESKY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Mort" (sometimes "Mortie" or 
"Moe") wants to be a successful 
dental technician. His favorite ex- 
pression is "Is that so?" He says 
he has no best virtues (modest lad) 
and thinks his worst fault is not 
knowing what his worst fault is. For 
a hobby he follows all types of sports. 



JOHN MEOLA 

Business Course 

"That's right," agrees John. "Mel- 
low," as he is called, is marked with 
a personable disposition. His ambi- 
tion is to succeed in any undertaking 
he may choose. "Mellow's" favorites 
on the radio and screen worlds are : 
Bing Crosby, Bob Hope, and Rudy 
Vallee. 



ANITA JUDITH MEYEROVITZ 

Business Course 

Teeta, "but definitely," wants to be 
a good secretary. In the Commercial 
Club, and chairman of Senior Play 
Candy Committee. Loves dancing, 
and picking up new steps. Likes 
popular and classical music. 



WALTER J. MOGAN ("Mog", 
;'Walt") 
Claims to have no virtues and too 
many faults to list — yet really 
"wants to become someone" — plans 
to go to some other business school, 
or possibly become a veterinarian at 
Middlesex U. — saves photographs — 
Likes Tommy Dorsey, 9 :20 Club, 
Gang Busters, and whistling — Ac- 
tive in Commercial Club and Bowl- 
ing, 2. 



STELLA E. MORREALE ("Star") 

Business Course 

Stella is the energetic type, likes 
walking, skating and dancing. Other 
activities that keep her busy are Com- 
mercial Club. C. W. N. Club and 
Septum Club. Her best virtue is 
trying to help others. Special man- 
nerism is fooling with her hair. Des- 
tination — some office. Her favorite 
expression is "I'm starved." 



Class of 1941 — ~™ — 



ELIZABETH MARIE MORROW 

Business Course 

"Betty" exclaims, "Merciful Heav- 
ens!" as she pursues her hobby, col- 
lecting snapshots. Her ambition to 
be successful is in direct contact with 
her destination to be a stenographer 
in a business firm. Betty, who has 
been active as a room agent for two 
years likes to attend movies and lis- 
ten to the Henry Aldrich program. 
She doesn't like being kept waiting! 



JOHN J. MOYNIHAN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jack's" favorite expression seems 
to be "What do you think, Earl?" 
Having served for a short while as 
sports editor of the Mirror" and 
played on the football team 3, he 
intends to be a sports commentator. 
Listening to the radio and drinking 
cokes at Howard Johnson's are his 
hobbies. He admits liking also food, 
shows, and money. 



CARMELLA A. NATALE 

Business Course 

"Millie" has a grand ambition — 
to be the perfect secretary, good luck! 
Her hobby is day dreaming about 
the future. Her favorite expressions 
are "What, dear!" and "I didn't do 
it." Likes the 9:20 Club and peer- 
ing over her glasses at Miss Rigby. 
It scares her. Trying to please every- 
one is her best virtue. Commercial 
Club, C. W. N. Club and Septum 
Club are her activities. 



CHARLES I. NAVTEN 

Practical Arts Course 

"Charlie" is an inquisitive lad who 
frequently asks "What cha do last 
night?" Expects to be a chef or 
baker in a Boston hotel. Hobby is 
collecting pennants and his pet like 
is traveling. 



PHYLLIS A. NOBILE 

Business Course 

"Phyl's" destination is a good po- 
sition and Honolulu. Ambition is to 
be a dress designer. "Heavens" and 
"what, deah?" are her pet expres- 
sions. Phillie likes music and danc- 
ing, but dislikes waiting for people. 
Her best virtue is an understanding 
nature. Being moody is her worst 
fault. Enjoys listening to Bob Hope. 
Member of Commercial Club, C. W. 
N. Club and Septum Club. 




VIRGINIA MORROW 

Business Course 

"Ginny" or "Red", as she is called, 
has an unusual favorite expression. 
It is "Carrot tops are green!" prob- 
ably to protect herself from being 
called "Red", which is her pet 
peeve. Ginny's ambition is to be a 
secretary in the White House. Her 
hobby is collecting records, and she 
hopes to work days and go to school 
nights. Some of her activities are: 
Commercial Club, Tennis, 1939 ; and 
Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. "Ginny" says 
that she likes parties and listening 
to Artie Shaw, dislikes homework 
and likes to swim, play tennis, and 
skate. She spends her time listening 
to 9:20 Club and Information Please. 

BARBARA MARIE MURPHY 

Business Course 

To be the perfect stenographer is 
the ambition of "Babs", and she also 
hopes to become a stenographer that is 
valued by her employer. Bab's hob- 
by is collecting memoirs of the World 
War, and her other extra-curricula 
activities include Senior Play Com- 
mittee and the Commercial Club. 
She likes mocha frappes and Tommy 
Dorsey's orchestra, also the 9 :20 
Club. Barbara states that her worst 
faults are an inferiority complex, 
and impatience. Her best virtue is 
being on time. 

JOSEPH J. NATOLI 

Practical Arts Course 

"Jolitin Joe from Idaho" wants to 
be a professional dancer and fre- 
auently remarks "Thanks, old boy". 
Hobby is collecting old newspaper 
clippings. Enjoys swimming, canoe- 
ing and playing baseball. Expects 
to work in a hardware store after 
graduation. His worst fault is go- 
ing after blondes and losing out. 



PHYLLIS J. NELSON ("Phyl", 
and "Babyface Nelson") 

Business Course 

Always asking "Why?" She wants 
to travel, particularly as a compan- 
ion to a rich old lady. Activities in- 
clude Honor Roll and Commercial 
Club. Hobby is skiing. 



SHELDON A. NUSSINOW 

Practical Arts Course 

Claims he has no nickname. Fre- 
quently says "Hi ya, cuddles'". 
Wants to be a millionaire, enjoy 
life and be a coat designer. Activ- 
ities include Football, 3; and Band, 
1. Hobby is photography. Likes 
girls, loud clothes and more girls 



iy 



] 
] 



•Class of 1941' • 



] 



1 
] 

1 



ELIZABETH L. OHNEMUS 

("Betty", "Sandy") 

Teachers' College Course 

Expects to attend a Junior College 
and hopes to become a secretary. 
Hobbies are skating, walking, sew- 
ing and driving. Likes movie maga- 
zines, red and blue, butterscotch, 
9:20 Club. Hit Parade, and Take-It- 
or-Leave-It. Dislikes homework. Worst 
fault is being too quiet. Activities 
include all sports ; Dramatic Club ; 
Picture Room Agent, 2 ; Senior Dance 
Committee ; and Soph. Social Com- 
mittee. 



BEATRICE L 

Practical Art 

Likes physics, 
hobbies are swimming 
best virtue and worst 
and writing notes — 
letter," "Mmm" and 
are favorite expressions 



OLDING 

Course 

boats, and kittens — 

talking (also 

fault) sailing, 

"Write me a 

"Hey You!" 

Dramatic 



Club, 2 ; Ticket Committee Senior 
Play — "Bee" wants to go to Ar- 
gentina with Olga. 



RICHARD F. O'TOOLE ("Dick", 
"Slug") 

Stenographic Course 

Favorite expressions are "Hey, 
George," and "It's the Six Little 
Tailors." Ambition is to become a 
credit to Waltham High. Expects to 
become a stenographer, and also one 
of Waltham's best undertakers. He 
is a member of the Commercial Club. 
Dislikes girls who fall in paint 
buckets, and going to the dentist 
Likes 9:20 Club, chocolate frappes. 
his English period. 1 :45 bell, and 
week-ends. 



OLGA PANDA 

Practical Arts Course 

Olga, known more commonly as 
"Olley," likes astronomy and eating. 
To travel around the world is her 
chief ambition. Sports and letter 
writing are her hobbies. School ac- 
tivities include basketball, 1 ; and 
Junior Nominating Committee. 



JOSEPHINE R. PARELLO 
Practical Arts Course 
Has the romantic ambition of going 
to Hawaii. After leaving High 
School hopes to enter a business 
school. Active in bowling. Operetta 
chorus. Glee Club, and tennis. 
"Joy", "Joey", or "Jo" often says 
"What do you know?" Her hobbies 
are sports, music and driving. 




BETTY OHNEMUS 



MARION LOUISE OLIVO 

Business Course 

Favorite expression is "Fiddle 
sticks" — Activities include Commercial 
Club, Old Maid's Club, Soph. Nomi- 
nating Committee, Glee Club, and 
Honor Roll, I, 3 -- Ambition is to 
grow old gracefully — Destination 
is that certain spot east of the sun 
and west of the moon — Hobbies are 
dancing, bike-riding, and bowling — 
Dislikes people who lack sense of 
humor — Favorite programs are 9 :20 
Club, Kay Kyser, and Jack Benny — 
Worst fault is chewing gum. 



PHYLLIS GILDA PALADINO 

Stenographic Course 

"Jill's" favorite radio program is 
the 9:20 Club. She dislikes homework. 
Her worst fault is being quick tem- 
pered. Her virtue is being good na- 
tured. She likes sports, evidenced by 
Baseball, 1, 2; Basketball, 1, 2, 3: 
Hockey, 1; Volley Ball, 1. 2; Arch- 
ery, 1, 2. A Commercial Club mem- 
ber, "Jill" would like to become a 
file clerk or typist. 



STEVE GEORGE PAPIA 

Business Course 

Would like to have a business of 
his own or get a good position in a 
successful firm. Favorite expression 
is, "It ain't beans, it ain't hay, you 
can't eat it, but — " Hobbies include 
raising pigeons and collecting pictures. 
Likes pretty girls with dark black or 
brown hair. Favorite radio program 
is the 9 :20 Club. Best virtue is 
ability to take care of himself, and 
others also. 



CHARLES PAZZANO 

Trade School — Auto 



-Class of 1941 



BARBARA S. PEARSON 

Destination — Wheelock School, and 
after that "Barh' wants to travel — 
"It's a chisel," she admits and just 
to be different she dislikes Jack 
Benny along with spinach — Activi- 
ties include basketball, volley ball, 
bowling, 1, 2, 3: Archery, 1; Mirror 
Room Agent, 1 : Dramatic Club, 
Operetta. 



ROBERT A. PEIRCE 

Technical Course 

The "Professor's" ambition is to 
go to aeronautical school and to be- 
come an aviation mechanic. His hob- 
bies are his Ford V-8 and his pipes. 
His pet peeves, tsk. tsk, are "Ducky" 
ard "U. B." His worst fault is 
smoking old pipes. His favorite ex- 
pression is "That'll be the day!" 



CHARLES M. PEPPER 

Business Course 

"Some spook, don't you think? " 
whispers "Chuch" hoarsely across the 
corridors. Otherwise known as "Pep" 
and "Honeychile" our active Charlie 
includes in his activites these : Pub- 
licity Manager of the Mirror, 1940- 
41, Publicity Manager of the Senior 
Play, Dramatic Club, 1, 2. 3; Com- 
mercial Club, Social Committee Com- 
mercial Club, Operetta Cast. Char- 
lie's ambition is to be successful in 
the business world and also, paradox- 
ically enough, to have a swing or- 
chestra. A double life, Charlie? His 
destination is Boston University night 
school. His extra time will prob- 
ably be spent in collecting records of 
good swing bands, as he does now. 

GEORGE ROBERT PETERSON 

Technical Course 

Fishing and school in general are 
O. K. with "Pete" but his pet peeves 
are German and "U. B." Going to 
the movies is his worst fault. Pete 
wants to go to Lowell Institute and 
to become a chemist. His favorite 
expression is "Cut the oil." 



MAE ROSALLA PHILLIPS 

Practical Arts Course 

Eating is Mae's hobby and sip- 
ping sodas her pet like. Mae com- 
monly called "Bubbles" enjoys the 
9:20 Club. Sometime she intends to 
take a trip around the world. Often 
says "Why Sure!" 





\^ '> 





JOHN PIANTEDOSI ("Plumber", 
ber", "Joe") 

Business Course 

Frequently says "Step aside, Sonnv 
boy." Likes girls, 9:20 Club, and 
Amos and Andy. If made a candi- 
date for the presidency, he asks for 
your votes. 



JOHN J. PENDERGAST 

Civic Course 

"Pendy's" pet expression is "Oh 
brother! Cut it Out! Cut it out!" 
He hopes to find an uninhabited 
island in the South Seas where he 
can spend his life in peace and quiet. 
Dislikes noisy, "I'm it," people, but 
likes reasonably quiet people, and 
the 9:20 Club. 



MARGUERITE E. PERNA 

Business Course 

"Boot's" ambition is to be your 
hairdresser in Waltham's finest Beau- 
ty Salon. Her hobbies are reading, 
singing, and stage makeup. Dramat- 
ic Club and Commercial Club are her 
chief interests in school. She may 
often be heard saying, "Please dis- 
pense with the unnecessary circum- 
locutions." 



EDWARD J. PETROVICH 

Technical Course 

"Bullet" wants to work and go to 
night school or live out west, build 
airplanes, and above all to be happy. 
Hobby is sports and his activities in- 
clude basketball and baseball. Eddie 
likes to keep active and to help 
people. His favorite expression is 
"To heck with it." 



ARTHUR D. PORTER 

Technical Course 

"Art" wants to become a chemist 
after going to M. I. T. Stamp col- 
lecting, building model airplanes, 
and golf are his hobbies. Active in 
Band, 1, 2, 3. Art's worst fault is 
laughing in class but he attributes 
it to his best virtue — good natured- 
ness. 




] 

] 



♦J," 



RUTH MARIE POWER 

College Course 

"It's a great world if you don't 
weaken,'' says our Rufus, whose hob- 
by is worrying. Her ambition is to 
be a chemist or something of that 
nature, and she expects to enter col- 
lege in the fall. Her activities were 
directed to : The Mirror staff, Dra- 
matic Club, Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3; and 
th Executive Committee. She likes 
ice cream, silly people, Fred Allen, 
but defifinitely dislikes homework. 



THOMAS W. OUALTERS 

Civic Course 

"Slushy" likes driving, sleeping, 
playing golf, and listening to good 
swing bands, but does not like to be 
kept waiting. His favorite expres- 
sion is "Tell me more." Hopes to 
get a good job and buy a car with 
his own money. Talking with his 
hands is his special mannerism. Ac- 
tivities : Junior Nominating Com- 
mittee. 



JOHANNE M. RANDO 

Practical Arts Course 

Ambition is to be a beautician — 
favorite expression is "Sugar", "Holy 
Cow" — Jo-Jen belongs to Merry 
Go Round Club — pleads guilty to 
using slang expressions but best vir- 
tue is her smile — likes all sensible 
girls and dislikes W. H. S. glamour 
girls and for a hobby irons pretty 
things. 



HARRY N. REAL 

Practical Arts Course 

Harry, known as "Red", wants to 
enter college and become a success 
some day. He likes skiing and sodas. 
He often says, "Nice going — or 
working hard." Photography is his 
hobby. Spending money, his worst 
fault. 



DOROTHY E. REYNOLDS 

Practical Arts Course 

To be a good secretary is "Dot's" 
ambition and for that purpose she 
plans to go to a secretarial school. 
Often says "Oh sugar". Learning 
new dances is her hobby — dislikes 
wearing a hat but likes especially 
pickles, crackers, and meeting new 
people. 



Class of 1941 — - — * 




RICHARD A. PUNZO 

Technical Course 

"Master" Punzo's ambition is to be 
commissioned with the air corps, 
(army or navy). Active as chairman 
of Senior Play Ticket Committee. 



"What's 
hear him 



the 
say. 



story i 



you'll often 



JUNE ELEANOR RALPH 

("Babe", "Ralphie") 

Business Course 

June has a reputation for eating 
soup, "talking to a certain history 
teacher," and (just between you and 
me) nice clothes. She likes : — a 
certain blonde, Jack Benny and Tom- 
my Dorsey. Dislikes : Being on time 
in 102. Destination : a secretary's 
desk.. Activities : Junior Prom Com- 
mittee, Glee Club. 



DORIS A. RASMUSSON 

Business Course 

"Razzy's" favorite expression is 
"Sure, kid", Her destination is a 
good stenographic position. Her ac- 
tivities include the Commercial Club, 
bowling, movies, riding, and skating. 



JOHN ANGELO RENNA 
("Johnny") 
Favorite radio program is Major 
Bowes. Worst fault is arguing, es- 
pecially with "Stinger" Papia. Am- 
bition is to be a success in whatever 
work he undertakes. Expects to take 
special training in welding school. 
Hobbies are crosswork puzzles, roller 
skating, and pool. Best virtue is 
knowing how to take care of himself. 



JEANNE P. RINGER 

Teachers' College Course 

Jeanne's hobby is photography. 
She intends to study it further. 
Reading is her pastime and being 
modest her best virtue. 






MARJORIE B. ROBSON 

("Madge", "Margie") 

Stenographic Course 

Wow-de-dow ! Marge wants to be 
a success and "enjoy life". Her 
habit of forgetfulness should help. 
Admits her best virtue still has to 
be discovered, and "talks" with her 
hands. Likes the color blue, tailored 
clothes, and steak (yum, yum!) Dis- 
likes washing dishes, being interrupt- 
ed. Belongs to the Commercial Club. 



MIRIAM ROUFFE 

College Course 

Although she likes to say, "Go 
'way!" we know that "Mims" is 
really a gregarious soul with many 
friends. A really talented musician, 
Miriam hopes to become a music 
teacher, and she spends her leisure 
and otherwise in practicing and im- 
proving her piano studies. Miriam 
has been music editor of Mirror, a 
member of the Waltham High School 
Orchestra, an Honor Roll student 
for three years, and accompanist at 
assemblies. Her natural dislike goes 
to people who telephone and say 
"Guess who this is?" She likes to 
listen to Fletcher Wiley and Infor- 
mation Please, and also likes to 
read. Her pet virtue is sincerity. 



JOSEPHINE J. RUSSO 

College Course 

"Jo" likes reading and Lux Radio 
Theatre. Was on the Honor Roll, 
2, 3. Her destination is the stars. 
Josie's favorite expression is "What 
a life". " 



CHARLES FRANCIS RUTTER 

("Chick", "Joe") 

College Course 

Chick is in general an outdoor man, 
his specialties being football, track, 
and hockey and his hobby sports in 
general. After going through Tufts 
he has the creditable if common am- 
bition to make a million. His only 
dislike is "hauling Towne around in 
the car." 



KENDALL EARL SANDERS, JR. 

Business Course 

"Ken" is one of those whose am- 
bition is "to be Somebody." His 
destination is the top of the ladder. 
Also known as Junior, or Rudolpho 
(from operetta), Ken likes to say, 
"You said it, Honey, an' how!" His 
activities include Commercial Club, 
Dramatic Club, Senior Play cast, and 
operetta cast. Ken dislikes garrulous 
females, and his pet peeve is having 
his name mis-spelled or mispro- 
nounced. His best virtue is being 
agreeable, and he just loves to eat. 




LAWRENCE LEROY ROGERS 

Business Machines Course 

"I dislike my curly hair," says 
Lawrence. "Buddy," "Buck," "Lar- 
ry", "Hacker", or what you will, 
also claims, "My worst fault is my 
quick temper and my best virtue is 
smiling." "Buddy's" ambition is to 
become an officer in the U. S. Navy. 
His favorite expressions are : "Hold 
the 'phone" and "When do we eat? " 
Some of his activities include: Room 
Agent, Mirror ; Advertising Commit- 
tee, Senior Play, Member of Com- 
mercial Club. Golf Team. 1940-4!, 
Honor Roll, 3. 



CARMELA CONSTANCE RUSSO 

("Carme") 

Business Course 

After leaving High School, she ex- 
pects to work and hopes to become a 
success in the business world. Mem- 
ber of the Commercial Club. Favor- 
ite expression is "What in the 
world!" Likes to listen to Lux- 
Theatre and Easy Aces and to get 
good marks. Dislikes written and 
oral compositions. Worst fault is 
not making enough noise. Hobby is 
reading. 



RITA C. RUSSO 

Business Course 

"Rea's" ambition is to be a suc- 
cessful typist. She wants to be a 
mess cook for the army boys. Her 
activities are Commercial Club and 
Glee Club. Dancing, horseback rid- 
ing, bowling, skating, and swiming 
are her hobbies. "No kidding!" she 
often says. She likes banana splits, 
Jack Benny, and Glenn Miller. 



JASON H. SAMUELS 

Technical Course 

"Hi! Doo-daa" — yep, that s 
"Jay" speaking (alias "Jasper" or 
"Gcston"), Destination — college, 
hobby — drawing, activities — bas- 
ketball team and baseball team. Ad- 
mits he doesn't shave enough, but 
makes up for it by being sincere. For 
entertainment. Jay likes Benny Good- 
man's orchestra and Fibber McGee. 



LAURA E. SANGERMANO 

Business Course 

"Lullie's" ambition is to become a 
vocalist or a typist. Her activities 
include, Glee Club, Commercial Club. 
Operetta, Soph. Nominating Commit- 
tee, and South Junior Alumni. She 
likes music, piano playing, Metropoli- 
tan Opera, shows, dancing, radio, and 
skating. 



]l 
1 
1 

I 
J 






]l 






ANGELINA GRACE SANTALU- 
CITO ("Ann", "Sandy") 

Business Course 

Hobby is collecting knickknacks — 
Ambition is to be a success in what- 
ever she does — Hopes to find a 
steady job after leaving high school 

— Favorite expression is "Oh, gee" 

— Likes people with a sense of hu- 
mor — Dislikes loud people — Worse 
fault is losing her temper — Favor- 
ite on the air is Vaughn Monroe. 



ALICE E. SAUMSIEGLE 

Practical Arts Course 

"I'll think about it," or "Oh you 
thing!" are "Allies" favorite ex- 
pressions. She's headed for art school 
after graduation, for her ambition is 
to be an artist. Hobbies number : 
crocheting (domestic types you know), 
dancing, drawing and dates. Activi- 
ties include: orchestra, 1, 2, 3; and 
Scatterbrains. 



BARBARA M. SHEDD 

Practical Arts Course 

"Barbs" ambition is to get her li- 
cense and earn a lot of money. In 
the meantime she plans to go in 
training to be a nurse. Pet expres- 
sion — "You're crazy". Hobby is 
collecting stuff from restaurants. 
"Sheddie" likes driving, swimming, 
and bowling. Does not like moody 
people. Enjoys the Hit Parade and 
I Love a Mystery. Activities include 
North Junior Alumnae Committee, 
and bowling, 1, 2, 3. 



HAROLD E. SIMMONS 

Technical Course 

After graduation "Simi" plans to 
enter M. I. T. and some day hopes 
to organize a swing band and settle 
down in Montana. Activities include: 
chairman of Soph. Social, chairman 
of Senior Nominating Committee, and 
Soph. Nominating Committee. Often 
says "Aw, cut it out" and enjoys 
Scouting and swimming. 



RICHARD L. SMELLEDGE 

Business Course 

Dick's destination is Business 
School and to travel cross country. 
Jerking sodas is his hobby. Pet ex- 
pression is "Is that right". Activities 
include Baseball and Cafeteria. 




GILDA R. SARDI 

Teachers' College Course 

"Jill' wants to travel to Little 
America, and the South Seas, and 
then to come back to the Newton 
Hospital Training School for Nurses. 
"Jill" is a regular, all-round girl, 
participating in field hockey, baseball, 
captain of basketball team, archery, 
the Dramatic Club, Sports Editor and 
member of Literary Staff of Mirror 
and also room agent for the Mirror. 
"Oh gosh," she says, "May I take 
your French?" 



HELEN SCHAUFUS ("Schauf") 

Business Course 

Helen's hobby is wearing odd jew- 
elry. She particularly likes arguing 
and Brigham's sundaes. Her pet 
peeve is writing compositions. After 
acquiring a Cadillac her destination 
is Hilton Village, Virginia. Her ac- 
tivities include the Commercial Club 
and North Junior Alumnae. 



DOROTHY SHEDD 

Stenographic Course 

"Slug's" ambition is to be success- 
ful in the business world. Her p<_t 
expression is "What's new?" Junior 
Prom Committee, Hockey, Bowling, 
Basketball, Baseball, Archery, and 
Commercial Club are her numerous 
activities. She likes straight stocking 
seams and plaid skirts, but absolute- 
ly dislikes that 6:45 A. M. feeling 
on week days. 



DONALD E. SKAKLE 

Practical Arts Course 

Collecting banners and taking A. B. 
to the movies is Don's hobby. Being 
nice to A. B. and reading in class 
are his best virtues. Enjoys being 
friends with every one, and listening 
to Glenn Miller. He likes to take 
menus from Howard Johnson's. His 
worst fault is being late. Don plans 
to be a newspaper man. His activi- 
ties include: Football, 1, 2, 3; Bas- 
ketball, 1, 2, 3; Captain of Tennis, 
1, 2, 3; Senior Nominating Commit- 
tee ; Junior Prom Committee ; Mirror 
Room Agent, 1, 2. 



DONALD R. SMITH 

Practical Arts Course 
"Smitty" or "Messerschmitt" wants 
to be a navy pilot and enter the air 



corps — LInique 
race cars for half 
skiing, skating, 
photography, and 
ing out books in 



favorite pastime in school. 



hobby is building 
mile track — Likes 
fishing, drawing, 
airplanes — Weai- 
the library is his 






MARION F. SMITH 

Stenographic Course 

"Bonnie's" worst fault is wanting 
her own way. Likes buying clothes 
and receiving long, interesting letters. 
"Smitty's" favorite expression is 
"You know" and her ambition is to 
be a star reporter or private secretary. 
Activities include Commercial Club 
and Senior Photographic Committee. 



FLORENCE VIVIEN SOMERSET 

College Course 

Some day Florence hopes to be- 
come a well-known actress, therefore 
she intends to study further at the 
Leland Powers Dramatic School. _ Al- 
though her favorite phrase, "Dog- 
gone it, anyway," is not the very 
best in grammatical expressions. Flor- 
ence was a member of the Literary 
Staff of Mirror in 1938-9. Her fa- 
vorite radio program is Information 
Please, and her pet like — heated 
conversationalists — her pet dislikes 
consist of hypocrites, homework, and 
cold weather. Her best virtue is 
loyalty. 

MARGARET T. TARPEY 

Practical Arts Course 

"Margie" wants to be a nurse — 
for a hobby collects match cards — 
Her favorite expression is "I don't 
know" — Likes chewing gum and 
actually admits that her worst fault 
is hitting people — Now, "Mareie" 
is that the way to be a good little 
girl? 



HELEN N. TERRELL 

Business Course 

"Terry" wants to be a switch 
board operator or a responsible and 
competent stenographer. Dramatic 
Club, Commercial Club, Glee Club, 
Volley Ball, Operetta cast, and be- 
ing a Mirror Room Agent keep 
"Terry" pretty busy. Her best vir- 
tue is keeping friends. 



GLORIA TIDMAN 

Stenographic Course 

Gloria's ambition is to be a good 
secretary. Likes having fun, but dis- 
likes waiting. Getting embarressed is 
"Glo's" worst fault. Her pet ex- 
pressions are "jah" and "merci beau- 
coup". Activities include Senior Play 
Committee, Dramatic Club, 3 ; Execu- 
tive Committee, Commercial Club, 
Bowling, 1, 2, 3; Honor Roll, 1, 2; 
N. W. V.'s, Cats Club, Cafeteria, 
2, 3. 




PATRICIA SMYLIE 

Stenographic Course 

Pat wants to be a good secretary. 
Goes around saying, "Any news for 
me today?" for she's High School 
Notes reporter, In Senior Play, the 
Dramatic Club, the Commercial Club, 
and the North Junior Alumni. She 
likes cheeseburgers, but not coconut, 
■nor orange. We often see her raise 
her left eyebrow unconsciously. 



STEPHEN J STRAGGAS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Butch" also wants to join the 
air force or go to a naval training 
school — For activities he has played 
basketball and football and his fa- 
vorite expression is "Do you get us?" 
He mentions blondes and Artie Shuw, 
pet likes we assume. 



MARGARET F. TERESTRE 

("Marge", "Margy") 

Business Course 

"Marge's" ambition is to be a 
good stenographer and her most im- 
portant hobby is music. Her favor- 
ite programs are Kay Kyser and 9 :20 
Club. She is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club. 



RITA THURBER 

Practical Arts Course 

"Rit" expects to go to business 
school and then hopes to become a 
secretary in a school office or in a 
large concern. The color red, Tom- 
■my Dorsey's music, and mocha 
frappes are her pet likes. Laughing 
and being friendly is her best virtue, 
while not listening is her worst fault. 
"Why sure, sure 'nuff, shucks!" ; s 
her favorite expression. 



BERNARD J. TIERNEY ("Spike ", 
"Bern") 

Practical Arts Course 

Spike hopes to be a naval ace after 
he has joined the Naval Air Force. 
He wants to live to see the "Red 
Raiders" play a whole season unde- 
feated and to have time to listen to 
his favorite radio programs : the Hit 
Parade and the 9:20 Club. Activities 
include Mirror Room Agent, Hockey 
2, 3, 4: Baseball, and Football. 



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CARL TINGLOF, JR. 

Technical Course 

"Ting" wants to attend Northeas- 
tern and become a mechanical en- 
gineer. Swimming and stamp col- 
lecting are his hobbies. His worst 
fault is being a procrastinator (look 
that one up, folks) and he dislikes 
studies and homework. 



GUY M. TUCCERO 

Business Course 

"Toosie-ro" expects to go to the 
Bentley School and then becme a 
Certified Public Accountant. His hob- 
by is writing stories, perhaps about 
the cafeteria. He is a member of 
the Commercial Club and was on the 
Honor Roll, 3. 



PAUL L. URPIN ("Urp") 

Business Course 

Ambition is to take a trip 
fornia. Favorite expression 
a, kid!" Activities include 
the American Legion, 
ing all kinds of cars. 



to Caii- 
is "Hy 

Sons of 
Hobby is driv- 
Expects to get 



a good job and save his money. Pet 
dislike is doing homework. Likes 9:20 
Club. Worst fault is not smiling 
enough. 



JOHN T. WALLACE 

Civic Course 

Wallace, "the Captain", hopes to 
go into the refrigeration and air con- 
ditioning business of the railroad. 
He likes hiking and "I Love a Mys- 
tery". His worst fault is lazing 
around the house and listening to the 
radio. Activities : member of the 
Stage Committe of the Senior Play. 



LLOYD WILMONT WADE 

Civics Course 

"Hickey's" unique ambition is "to 
have a position — not a job" and 
second choice is to live in Hawaii. 
"I don't get it?" says he — there- 
fore his hobby — borrowing Delorey's 
vocabulary' lessons! "Limey" as he 
is also called, collects stamps and 
model airplanes. He'd like to at- 
tend Wentworth Institute. He likes 
Bob Hope, Kay Kyser, Ginny Simms, 
and Harry Babbitt. He dislikes 
lending money. 




NATHAN WARREN TOWNE 

College Course 

"Nate" dislikes Whalen asking him 
to get the car but he enjoys eating. 
He's often seen scratching his head 
and saying "mornin." "Nate" plans 
to enter Bowdoin next year. Activ- 
ities include Football, 3; Hockey, 1, 
2, 3; Tennis, 1, 2; Baseball, 2; 
Sports Editor of Mirror, 3 ; Senior 
Dance Committee, 3 ; and Operetta, 3. 



ETHEL J. TYNER 

Business Course 

"Tiny's" ambition is to work in an 
office and be a success. Collecting 
knickknacks is her hobby. Likes 
dancing, cakes, recordings, Vaughn 
Monroe, and Bob Hope. Dislikes bos- 
sy people. Acting on impulse is her 
worst fault. "Tinker" makes up for 
this by being good in Mr. Lee's 
room. "Is that right?" is her fa- 
vorite expression. Activities — Mir- 
ror Room Agent, '40-41. Also a 
Commercial Club member. 



BARBARA ANN VOYMAS ("Bab- 
bie", "Babs") 
Favorite radio program is the 9 :20 
Club. Hobby is collecting pictures 
of animals. Worst fault is losing 
her temper. Favorite expression is 
"Oh yeah". Member of Commercial 
Club. Hopes to get a steady job. 
Ambition is to be a success in what- 
ever she does. 



JOHN A. WALSH 

Technical Course 

"Johnny" wants to go to M. I. T. 
and tour England on a bike. Likes 
music, Rex Marvin's Orchestra, and 
anything by Gershwin. Dislikes "jit- 
terbugs" and girls with "lines". His 
worst fault is wearing dirty shoes 
and colorful neckties but he makes 
up for this by being tolerant of hu- 
manity. 



ROBERT WEAGLE 

Printing — Trade School 



►-Class of 1941- 



THELMA GRACE WEAGLE 

Business Course 

"Tillie" is a girl that likes danc- 
ing, walking, (also driving) and jok- 
ing. She was in the operetta and is 
very fond of basketball. She is an 
active member of the Commercial 
Club. 



ROGER. R. WELLINGTON 

Practical Arts Course 

Ambition is to rise to the top in the 
navy, and hobby is collecting sport 
pictures. Activities: football, 1, 2, 3; 
baseball, and hockey. Is often called 
"Wibble" and his favorite expression 
is "What do you say?" Confesses 
to sleeping in Democracy class and 
then having nightmares about it. Al- 
so likes sleeping in the sun. Worst 
fault is borrowing money from H. W. 



RICHARD H. WHEATON 

Practical Arts Course 

•'Willie" or "Penrod" can often be 
heard saying "No fooling" and "Now 
I'll tell one". His ambition is to 
be a machinist and his hobby is 
sleeping. Likes colorful stockings 
and playing baseball. Confesses his 
worst fault is "bumming nickels off 
the bovs" and owing them later. 



EDWINA CLAIRE WILKIE 

("Teddy") 

College Course 

"C'mon Snook" is Teddy's stock 
phrase, and she likes chocolate 
frappes. Totem Pole, and Glenn Mil- 
ler. She has a marvelous idea for a 
heaven on earth, — "a week without 
a guiding hand." Teddy plans to be 
a nurse. A few of her very many 
activities are: Sophomore, Junior, and 
Senior Dance Committees, Cheer- 
leader, and Literary Committee of 
Mirror. 



CHARLOTTE GLADYS WOLK 

College Course 

"Charly" has a diverse personality. 
Her ambition is to be an interior 
decorator, aviatrix, fashion designer, 
Latin teacher, or anything else one 
can think of. Her hobbies are read- 
ing and music. Whenever you hear 
the phrase, "Only five more days 'til 
Friday, Sadie," you can bet your best 
fedora it's Charlotte. Active on the 
literary staff of Mirror 1-2-3, on the 
Senior Play Committee, and receiv- 
ing highest honors (All A's) and sec- 
ond honor roll for the three years, 




ROBERT EARL WEBB 

Practical Arts Course 

Bob. one of our young artists, is 
dreaming of a career in the Navy. 
He likes dancing, especially to Glenn 
Miller's Orchestra. 



T. HARRISON WHALEN 

Teachers' College Course 

Hauling "her" and Towne around 
is Harry's chief dislike which prob- 
ably accounts for his expression 
"What did I do?" To join the fleet 
and be an admiral is his ambition. 
While waiting around he likes to sit 
in on McCusker's "bull" sessions. 
Confesses going with out a necktie 
is his worst fault and that his big 
ears are his best virtue. Activities 
include Baseball, 2; Tennis, 1, 2, 3. 



HAZEL A. WILLARD ("Willie") 

Practical Arts Course 

Destination is the Kathleen Dell 
School. Hopes to become a social 
worker or a dietician. Hobby is read- 
ing. Likes the color blue ; to dance ; 
to listen to "I Love a Mystery ;" to 
drink mocha franpes at eleven o'clock : 
and Mr. Hodge's study room. 



WILMA CAROLYN WINBERG 

College Course 

"Will," or "Bill," as she is called 
is often heard to recite "Cut it out 
or "Smarty ! " Wilma is another who 
wishes to become a teacher some day. 
She would like to enter Bates College 
next fall. Her hobbies are all out- 
door sports and music, and her ex- 
tra-curricula activities are: Soph. 
Social Committee, Orchestra 1-2, Dra- 
matic Club 1-2-3, Honor Roll 1-2-3, 
and assembly accompanist. Wilma 
likes summer vacations, mocha ice 
cream at Dean's, and the 9:20 Club 
and Tommy Dorsey's music. Her 
best virtue is liking everybody. A 
very special mannerism is not being 
on time. 



ALBERT J. WOLLRATH, JR. 

Practical Arts Course 

"Al" wants to go to India and 
side in with a rich Maharaja. Fre- 
quently says "Yes Sir" or "So 
what?" Hobbies are studying plants 
and animals, aviation, and playing 
the "sax". Activities : band 1-2-3. 
orchestra 1-2-3. Intends to take up 
Civil Aeronautics Course and go to 
Stockbridge. 



] 



•Class of 1941* - 



] 



] 



; 



ROBERT R. WOOD ("Woodie") 

Civic Course 

Hopes to go to Florida in a 
Model A Ford. His pet expression 
is "It's a lot of propaganda." Likes 
quiet girls, hockey games, and the 
9:20 Club. His activities include 
Band (2 years) and Hockey (3 years). 
His worst fault is failing English 
tests, while keeping promises is his 
best virtue. 



GLADYS L. YOUNG 
Business Course 



LEON MERRILL GINSBURG 

College Course 

Tufts College is the "Count's" des- 
tination. Sophomore Social Commit- 
tee, Dramatic Club Plays, Dramatic 
Club and Senior Play are his school 
activities, while driving, dates, and 
dancing take up his leisure time. 
Confesses he longs for the end of 
school and dislikes German. Borrow- 
ing cars and singing out loud are 
his worst faults. 




GLORIA MAE WOODLAND 

Stenographic Course 



JAMES M. ZOGRAFOS 

Business Course 

Getting people out of jams is 
"Zizzie's" best virtue. "Buy the 
Mirror" is his pet expression. He 
likes floats and to be "doing some- 
thing". His numerous activities in- 
clude : Advertising Dept. of Mirror, 
I, 2; Business Manager of Mirror, 3; 
Advertising Chairman of Senior Play, 
2; Band, 1, 2; Commercial Club: 
Social Committee of Commercial 
Club; Dramatic Club; Honor Roll, 
1. 2, 3; Usher at Class Day and 
Graduation, 2. 



DOROTHY E. ELLIS ("Dot") 
Business Stenographic Course 
Hopes to be successful in whatever 
she attempts, and to travel. Favorite 
expression is "Hi! that's it." Worst 
fault is stubbornness. Likes pretty 
clothes, "Frenesi," Glenn Miller, the 
9 :20 Club, "Li'l Abner," "Terry and 
the Pirates," and Henry Aldrich. 
Staff Secretary of Mirror; Senior 
Play Committee ; Commercial Club 
Representative; Honor Roll, 1, 2, 3. 



KATHERINE PATRICIA 
HICKEY 

Business Course 

Proud are we of Kay's voice as 
lead in "Naughty Marietta". Her 
ambition is to sing as Lily Pons, or 
at least to sing over the radio, though 
she'll take an office job, right now. 
Collects new songs, and often ex- 
claims "Heavenly days!" Member 
of the Glee, Dramatic, and Commer- 
cial Clubs, and North Junior Alum- 
ni. Likes "First Nighter", dislikes 
catching busses. 



.1 



] 



KVXSnWWV'V^^iWO'XltlXBIiatDWKl I O C C Q f 1 Uj. 1 »<>««»-<*«»l <_•».<_- ._-<._ ». ,<_-.>_ <_■ .433.. i.^.., .«■»- V> 



ELINOR FRANCES BUCKLEY 

Business Course 

Bucky, with a sigh of relief on 
graduation day, will be off to "most 
any" job. Likes Roller-skating, and 
saying, "Is that so!" Member of 
the Commercial Club ; prefers to 
spend study periods in the library. 
Groans over all the stairs in Wal- 
tham High, but does homework with- 
out the groans. 



WILLIAM MARK HOPKINS 

Practical Arts Course 

"Happy's" hobby of collecting pic- 
tures of musicians and his ambition 
to become a good musician, of course, 
"Mark" him for that exclusive world 
of beauty and rhythm — swing mu- 
sic. He belonged to the Senior Band, 
1937-38-39-40, and was on the Senioi 
Dance Committee in 1940. "Happy" 
wants to play in a good dance band 
and he also likes football, hockey, 
good bands — and beautiful women. 



BAIN C. CAMPBELL 

Civics Course 

Likes blondes, photography, the 
9:20 Club and sleeping in study pe- 
riods — is often heard to say "Fiddle 
de dee" — dislikes unfriendly people 
— worst fault is blushing when cer- 
tain things happen — best virtue is 
being on time. 



WILLIAM J. MAIN 

Practical Arts Course 

Has been football usher, I, 2, 3 
His ambition is to travel around the 
globe — Destination is to enlist in 
the army and nicknames are "Battle- 
ship," "Bill," and "Main Street" — 
A. H.'s apples are always a pleasure 
— frequently says "Ain't hay." Hob- 
bies are reading and gardening. 



MARY M. DURNIN 

Practical Arts Course 



MARY M. GASPER 

Practical Arts Course 

Mary, who is rather on the silent 
side, has been working at Candyland. 
Drop in some time for a visit! She 
has been active in the Waltham High 
School Band, 1, 2, 3. 



EDITH J. GILBERT 

Practical Arts Course 



JOHN F. MAZZARINI ("Mazza," 
"Johnny," "Swisher") 

Civic Course 

Because he likes sports, "Johnny" 
desires to coach various sports in a 
school. He has several hobbies which 
include playing ping-pong and bil- 
liards, and making puzzles. His 
worst fault is cracking jokes all the 
time. He likes Bob Hope and Glenn 
Miller. Activities include Mirror 
Agent (1940-41), and Basketball (3 
years). 



ALICE LOUISE MOODY 

Practical Arts Course 

You often hear "Chickie" saying 
"I can't". Collecting stamps, read- 
ing and drawing appeal to her 
especially. 



JAMES M. GREGORECUS 

("Slim", "Punchy") 

Civic Course 

Ambition is to go to forestry school. 
He is often heard to say, "You're a 
goner." His hobby is making puz- 
zles. He likes to read and he says 
that he prefers blondes to brunettes. 
Activities : Manager of Boys' Club, 
Basketball team. 



MARIE PATRICIA MURPHY 

("Muffy") 

College Course 

"Love is a wonderful thing" to 
Muffy and no doubt it's wonderful 
to that Cedarwood hill-billy, too. 
Her ambition has already been at- 
tained ; she's proved that little people 
can do big things, even if she does 
argue with intelligent people. Be- 
sides being one of our favorite cheer- 
leaders, she's Treasurer of the Dra- 
matic Club, Sophomore and Junior 
Dance Committees, and Scatterbraiu 
Club. 



II 



]l 



Class of 1941' ———»-. — _,— — 



11 



II 



ALFRED J. O'RIELLY 

Business Course 

Likes all sports and girls, prefer- 
ably blondes — Wants to be Mayor 
of Lakeview but in case this isn't 
possible will consent to be a general 
in the army — Known to his friends 
at "Butch'' or "Snookie ", his hobby 
is making model airplanes and his 
favorite expression is "On the ball!" 



KATHARINE M. RUSSO ("Kit- 
ten", "Kitty", "Cathy") 
"No kidding" is "Kitty's" favorite 
expression and ping-pong, bowling, 
and classical music her favorite hob- 
bies. Her worst faults are impa- 
tience and nervousness and she's al- 
ways making faces when she talks. 
Her ambition is to become a private 
secretary after attending business 
school. She is a member of the Com- 
mercial Club. 



DOROTHY R. PORTER ("Dottie") 
"Dottie" hopes to attend art school 
and then be one of Walt Disney's 
staff. She dislikes slow or gloomy 
people but likes large crowds of 
people. Her sense of humor is her 
best virtue, while losing her temper 
is her worst fault. She is often 
heard to say, "Hold your back 
teeth!" Hobby, collecting souvenirs. 



FINEST TAILLAC'O 
Printing -- Trade School 
Speedy Ernie, quite a lad 

printer. Hopes someday to be 

up in Havana. 



as a 

away 



WILLIAM VAYDA 

Printing — Trade School 
No, Waltham is nice but 

is the town. 



Natick 



ELEANOR ANN RICCI ("Ellie", 
"El") 

Business Course 

Would like to travel and then live 
in the West — Favorite expressions 
are "What a doll!" "T'ain't funny, 
McGee ! " Hobbies are collecting or- 
chestra leaders and skating — Mem- 
ber of Commercial Club — Dislikes 
oral compositions — Likes 9:20 Club 
— Favorite program is Lux Theatre. 



FRANCIS WADSWORTH 

("Ivan", "Mort") 
Business Accounting Course 
Hopes to go to Boston College, 
then to work. Ambition is to become 
a salesman and see the world. Hob- 
by is football. Favorite expression is 
"You have more fun than a human." 
Dislikes a would-be opera singer's 
singing. Likes Marge and fried clams. 
Is sarcastic but keeps promises. 



— — Class of 1941 



Class History 



History, according to Webster, is a chronologi- 
cal record of events, and historical characters are 
people who make history. When we entered 
Waltham High School in September 1938, none 
of us realized that we were historical characters, 
but just by living our daily lives we have made 
history — the history of the class of 1941. 

Truth to tell, we did not have a great deal of 
enthusiasm for Waltham High when we entered. 
Everyone had told us about all the fun we could 
have, and how wonderful it was, but all we 
wanted was to be safely back in Junior High 
School. There we had been looked up to and 
admired, only because we were the oldest, per- 
haps, but the prestige was the important thing. 
Here we were the most insignificant of classes. 
We were not only the youngest, but we could not 
even find our way around. However, we soon 
became accustomed to the maze of corridors and 
all the strange people, and began to feel at home. 

Our first important step as a class was to elect 
our officers. Dick Bennett was our president; 
Ernest Frary, vice president; Shirley Higgins, 
secretary; and Andrew Meyer, auditor. After 
serious deliberation, we decided that "Semper 
Superare" (Always to Excel) was a motto fitting 
our class, also that purple and gold should be our 
class colors. Thus organized, we felt ourselves 
prepared for any occasion that might arise. 

That was the year that we really did try to 
study, but we were distracted by the noise of the 
construction work in the east wing. When that 
was completed, the High School was bigger than 
ever. 

Then came the event of the year, the Sophomore 
Social. The committee, under Harold Simmons, 
planned a very successful evening. The decora- 
tions were well executed, with Leon Ginsburg al- 
most a part of them. He and the streamers were 
left hanging from a basket when a ladder fell 
over. Barbara Hill and Irene Higgins sang, and 
we all danced the "Paul Jones". It was a won- 




MILDRED EDWARDSON 



derful party and gave us a certain feeling of im- 
portance, because only the members of our class 
were allowed to attend. 

June came, finally, and we were glad to leave 
school and yet glad that we were coming back, 
because next year we should no longer be "Silly 
Sophomores" but Juniors. 

In September it was our turn to look down on 
the lower classmen, but that was an opportunity 
that most of us let pass because we could all re- 
member our own feelings of a year ago. After 
we had been back at the old grind for a while, 
we did some thinking about class officers. Dick 
Bennett was again president, with Marie Murphy, 
Shirley Higgins, and Andrew Meyer completing 
the list. 

The football team did not win every game, but 
it was helped considerably by the Junior class 
boys. The basketball and hockey teams could not 
have been as successful as they were without our 
help either. 



--—Class of 1941 



■1)^11^1)4 



]! 




SENIOR NOMINATING COMMITTEE 

Standing: John Clark; Donald Skakle; Lucille Hatch; William MacDonald; 

John Madden 
Seated: Andrew Meyer; Ruth Alcott; Harold Simmons, Chairman; Shirley 

Higgins; Marshal Adams 




SENIOR DANCE COMMITTEE 

Standing: Warren Towne, Samuel Kerns, Elizabeth Ohnemus, William Hop- 
kins, Edwina Wilkie, Oscar Falling, Richard Hogue 

Sealed: Irene Kilpatrick, Muriel Cox, John Madden (Chairman), Richard 
Bennett, Pauline Eaton, Virginia Doucette 







SENIOR PLAY COMMITTEE 
Top Row: John Wallace, Robert Healy, Elmer Logan, Carrol Brown, Vincent 

Giminarda, Richard Punzo, Lawrence Rogers 
Second Row: Marjorie Robson, Gloria Tidman, Virginia Caminiti, Barbara 

Murphy, Dorothy Shedd, Natalie Mollica, Elaine Harnish, Patricia Smylie, 

Beatrice Olding 
Seated: Charles Pepper, Ruth Alcott, Louise Giminarda, James Zografos, 

Ruth Greene (Chairman), Anita Meyerowitz, Dorothy Ellis, William 

Boisvert 




PICTURE COMMITTEE 
Standing: Russell Longley; Richard Bennett; William 

Manning, chairman 
Seated: Marion Smith; Barbara Hill; Mildred Edwardson 



We spent most of that year absorbing enough 
knowledge to become Seniors. Spring came, driv- 
ing all thoughts from our heads, except those 
about the Junior Prom, of course. 



Oscar Falling was chairman of the committee. 
He did a wonderful job until about a week before 
the Prom when he was ignominiously retired from 
active service by the measles. It was a nasty, 
rainy night, but in spite of that the gym was 
crowded. We danced in a tropical setting of 
palms and stars and flowers, with even a monkey 
for atmosphere. 

In June the Senior class left us, but we were 
secretly glad to see them go because they left an 
empty space that we would be only too glad to 
fill in the fall. 

It was hard to realize that we were Seniors. 
We had waited long for this great event, but now 
that our goal had been achieved we didn't feel 
half as important as we expected to. 

With more than usual care we chose our class 
officers. Dick Bennett was president, assisted by 
Marie Murphy, Shirley Higgins, and George Cox. 

The football team did its very best, and finished 
the season with a record of three games won, 
three tied, and four lost. Captain Bill Manning 







SENIOR PLAY CAST OF "YOUNG APRIL" Courtesy of the Waltham News-Tribune 

Back Row: David MacMillan, Robert Healy, Richard Keenan, Leon Ginsburg. Middle Row: Kendall Sanders, 
Dorothy Dunklee, Eleanor Buckley, Jacqueline Barrows, Richard Hague. First Row: Esther Cohen, Patricia Smylie, 

Barbara Hill, Mildred Edwardson, Mary Burley, Ruth Alcott. 



set the team a good example and well — never 
let it be said that they didn't try. 

Before Christmas the picture committee had 
completed its work, and we had chosen our class 
photographer. It gave us a feeling of finality, as 
if we were to spend the whole year preparing to 
leave high school. 

In January John Madden and his committee 
started work on the Senior Dance. They did their 
best to make it a success, but an epidemic of flu 
didn't help at all. We might remark that there 
was plenty of room for dancing. 

The Senior Play came quickly enough to make 
us forget the failure of the dance. Ruth Greene 
chose "Young April", and it was a huge success. 
The committees were extremely helpful ; the cast 
wasn't a bit nervous; and everyone enjoyed the 



pcrrormance. It was even successful enough to 
pur the figures in our ledger back on the black 
side. 

Spring has come again, bringing with it the encl 
of our high school days. We've grown to like 
Waltham High in three years of close association 
and we rather hate to leave it, but all good things 
must come to an end. 

Our history as a class is finished. Today we 
are together for almost the last time. But in 
the future we may, by our own personal achieve- 
ment still add to the honor of our class. 

Some of us may win fame, and the rest of us 
may not make any great mark in the world; but 
whatever we do, may we, as the class of 1941, 
always excel ! 

Mildred Edwardson. 






c/^jj r/// 



To Whom It May Concern: 

We, the Class of 1941, of the Waltham Senior 
High School, being of sound mind and memory, 
after paying our just debts, do make and publish 
this, our last Will and Testament, hereby revok- 
ing all former wills. We do devise and bequeath 
all the rest, residue, and remainder of our estate 
as follows: 

To the Class of '42, we leave a large number 
of spotlessly clean, absolutely blank diplomas. If 
your class resembles in any way the graduating 
class, you wili probably have much use for them 
— one way or another. 

To the Class of '43, our naive juniors-to-be, 
we leave permission for unlimited gorging from 
the Tree of Knowledge, which you will find bears 
a profusion of fruit, ready to be gleaned from 
any room, from wing to wing, with the exception 
of the cafeteria. 

To Mr. Goodrich, our patient and understand- 
ing principal, whose inspiring leadership and 
sound counsel have played so great a part in our 
high school life^ we leave untold gratitude and 
love, and depart with the hope that he will al- 
ways keep us in mind. 

To Miss Scottron, our versatile Latin instructor, 
who, when she finishes correcting the numerous 
errors on her Waltham High papers, journeys to 
New York to aid in the correction of the Latin 
College Board exams, we leave a task which will 
probably prove very pleasant to her. It is this: 
For your leisure, Miss Scottron, we leave you 
copies of all of Wendell Willkie's campaign 
speeches, which you may have the privilege of 
translating into that expressive language, Latin. 

To Miss Flagg, one of the business depart- 
ment's greatest assets, we leave expressed all the 
pleasant thoughts her pupils have heretofore kept 
silent. Her great patience, her thoughtfulness, 
her absolute sincerity have won Miss Flagg a po- 




RUTH GREENE 



sition of high regard in the hearts of all her 
students. 

To Miss Viets, of the Mirror, we leave a very 
delightful furnished study, with brown wall paper 
and green Venetian blinds. Here we hope that 
she may some day escape from her many other 
responsibilities and concentrate on writing her 
memoirs. 

To Mr. Smith, our popular young history in- 
structor, we leave a ticket to Washington — not 
because that seems a fad for Mr. Smith — but 
rather that he may visit all the historic and his- 
tory-making buildings, and return with vital in- 
formation and colorful pictures to aid in his really 
fascinating work. 

To Mr. Ward, our dynamic sub-master, we 
leave our sincere thanks for the very efficient way 
in which he has cared for the interests of our 
class. We know the class of 1942 will appreciate 
his effective reading at morning assemblies. 



1 






To Charlie Pepper, for his very active work on 
the Mirror, the Dramatic Club, the Senior Play, 
the Operetta, and also because he is one of the 
popular members of the Senior Class, we leave a 
leather medal, knowing that all his grand children 
and great-great-grandchildren will look upon it 
with reverence and pride. 

To Patricia Smylie, one of our efficient report- 
ers and D. A. R. girl, we leave a bouquet of 
sweet peas in appreciation of all that publicity she 
gave so generously in that much-read column 
"What's New at Waltham High." We are certain 
that this, accompanied by our certificate of merit, 
will be sufficient for Pat to succeed further along 
journalistic lines. 

To James Zografos, our bustling business man- 
ager and "Buy a Mirror?" Man, we leave sixteen 
or twenty capable assistants who, in his future 
meteoric career, will follow doggedly at Jimmie's 
heels and obey his slightest whim. In that man- 
ner, Jimmie will probably accomplish sixteen to 
twenty times more results — if that is possible. 

To Dottie Ellis, our sparkling go-getter, or 
rather ad-getter, we leave a 1941 model scooter, 
equipped with lights, plates, and plenty of horns, 
so that she can get about more quickly and easily. 

To Elmer Logan, our capable stage manager 
for the Senior Play, we leave an erector set, so 
that should Elmer continue along professional 
lines, he will have little trouble in dismantling 
the stage after performances. 



To Jacqueline Barrows, the charming "Mrs. 
Miller", we leave Walter Winchell's much-wilted 
orchid for her really grand performance. Though 
the orchid be a bit faded, Jackie, our sentiments 
are completely sincere — you did a good job! 

We hereby nominate and appoint Miss Ober, 
Miss Gadboys and Mr. Mitchell, all of Waltham, 
county of Middlesex, and Commonwealth of Mas- 
sachusetts, as co-executors of this, our last Will 
and Testament, and we hereby direct said Execu- 
tors to pay all our just debts, costs of administra- 
tion and inheritance taxes out of our estate, and 
we hereby request that they be exempt from fur- 
nishing any surety or sureties on their official 
bonds. 

In testimony whereof we hereunto set our hand 
and seal and publish and declare this to be our 
last Will and Testament, in the presence of the 
Witnesses named below, this 4th day of June, 
A. D. 1941. 

Signed — The Class of 1941 

by — Ruth Greene. 

Signed, sealed, and published by the said Class 
of 1941 as and for their last Will and Testament, 
in the presence of us, who at their request, and 
in their presence, and in the presence of each 
other, have subscribed our names as witnesses 
thereto. 

Arline B. Darmedy 
George S. Woodman 
Edith H. Rand 



Codicil To The Last Will and Testament Of The Class Of 1941 



To Whom It May Concern: 

Know all men by these presents that we, the 
class of 1941, being of sound and disposing mind 
and memory, and wishing to direct in what man- 
ner our estate shall be disposed of after our de- 
cease, do make and publish this Codicil to our 
last Will and Testament dated June 4, 1941, 
hereby ratifying and confirming said Will in all 
respects except as changes by this instrument. 

We hereby nominate and appoint Virginia 
Doucette to be the Executrix of this, the Codicil 
to our last Will and Testament, and we hereby 
request that she be exempt from furnishing any 



surety or sureties on her official bond. 

To Robert Healy, our most studious boy in the 
Class of 1941, we leave this autographed copy of 
Einstein's book on the theory of relativity. We 
know that Robert will have just the time of his 
life perusing its pages of colorful description; 
and then, we hope he will write one of his excel- 
lent book reviews for us, so we shall know that 
our gifts were not given in vain. 

To Phyllis Keith, 194 l's glamour girl, we leave 
a lock of Hedy Lamarr's hair, which we are cer- 
tain as a bona fide glamour girl she will revere 
with faithfulness and true admiration. The locket 



Sx-— *■«■**>■•— ^-"^<'+^-<-^~-t>-mm-t<-mm-<nmB-ii-mm-<>-~-<<-^+,>-^>.<>., t lilSS O T I Q/J "I .. - , ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ , 



goes with it, Phil, so that you can wear it con- 
stantly. 

To Doris Jacobs, our most athletic girl, we 
leave with our best wishes, a "Yo-yo" top — 
now the craze in New York, so that she can keep 
in excellent physical trim. We know some very 
brawny people who find it most exhausting, but 
we are certain that "Jake" will be able to pull 
through for an hour or so every day. 

To Richard Smelledge, our 1941 fashion plate, 
we generously give, to complete his already strik- 
ing outfit, this pair of conservative socks. They 
should cause some eyebrow-lifting by Esquire. 

To Mildred Edwardson, our Bette Davis, we 
give this Waltham High Academy Award. You 
certainly deserve this, Middy — may your suc- 
cessful career carry over into future life. 

To William Manning, captain of the football 
team and all-letter man, we take pleasure in pre- 
senting this authentic, autographed, and amazing 
picture of Tom Harmon. We expect Bill to hang 
this in his room so that he may have it before 
him at all times. 

To June Ralph, our best dressed girl, we leave 
this Adrian-designed evening gown — Well, not 
exactly an evening gown, but it's Adrian-designed 
anyway — and we are sure that with your appre- 
ciation of the better clothes in life, June, you 
will thank us again and again. 

To Leon Ginsburg, Waltham High's Stirling 
Hayden, we proudly present this contract with 
the Rand and Roche Productions, Incorporated, 
for thirty years at a stupendous salary which we 
cannot divulge at this time. Uncle Sam, please 
take notice! 

To Pauline Dicks, best looking girl and bright- 
est social light, we leave a prediction. Yes, we 
looked into our magic ball and found that Pauline 
would be wearing some very lovely clothes just 
one year from now; so set the styles with this, 
Paulie! 

To Richard Bennett, our class president and 
most popular boy, we leave, at much expense, a 
luxuriously-furnished penthouse located on Cen- 
tral Park West, New York City. Here Dick may 
entertain lavishly his numerous friends and ac- 
quaintances. 



To Elaine Harnish, Waltham High's Cinderella 
girl, or the girl most likely to succeed and the 
most studious girl, we leave, knowing that it will 
be of invaluable aid, an engagement calendar, for 
both business and social engagements. It's been 
designed especially for you, Elaine, with enough 
room for telephone numbers and a precise system 
of keeping future college assignments. 

To Andrew Meyer, the capable editor of the 
Mirror and boy most likely to succeed, we be- 
stow a box of these Mongol blue-black pencils 
with which he may perfect all future written 
material. We know that these will aid in the 
grueling task of reshaping and rewording. 

To Marie Murphy, our most popular girl and 
Miss Personality Plus, we give with best wishes 
this smooth, 1942 model Packard Convertible. 
What, with the whole student-body at the Wal- 
tham High convertible-conscious, Muffy will be 
the envy of everyone's eyes. 

To Russell Longley, Waltham High's Robert 
Taylor, we leave a little blue book. All who at- 
tended the performance of "Young April" will 
understand that this will house addresses, tele- 
phone numbers, and "pertinent notations." 

To Robert Elder, our class wit, we leave a sixty- 
year subscription to "Political Science and the Lay- 
man", to neutralize his very definite tendency 
towards the ridiculous. 

In testimony whereof we hereunto set our hand 
and seal and publish and declare this to be the 
Codicil to our last Will and Testament, in the 
presence of the Witnesses named below, this 
fourth day of June, A. D., 1941. 

Signed — The Class of 1941 

by — Ruth Greene 

Signed, sealed and published by the said Class 
of 1941 as and for their last Will and Testament, 
in the presence of us, who at their request, and 
in their presence, and in the presence of each 
other, have subscribed our names as Witnesses 
thereto. 

Mary C. Mooney 
William J. Gallagher 
Lionel Mosher 






Class Prophecy 



"Miss Ellis", I ordered, "take a letter. 'Quote' 
Mr. John Mazzarini, President Ringiing Brothers, 
Barnum Bailey and Mazzarini Circus, Greatest 
Show on earth, etc. Dear Mr. Mazzarini: We 
believe that you will be interested in a proposition 
concerning proper winter clothing for your - er - 
Miss Ellis, can you think of a substitute for ele- 
phants? Try to conceive a roundabout way of 
saying red flannels for elephants." 

Having given her something to think about for 
a few minutes, I leaned back in my swivel chair, 
gazed across my polished mahogany desk and 
dreamily regarded the view of jumbled sky- 
scrapers piercing the sky. Being president of the 
Piggly Wiggly Underwear Co. was a big job, and 
lately I had been finding it difficult to keep my 
office force contented. Take those secretaries — 
I wish somebody would — Eleanor Bennett, Vir- 
ginia Doucett, and Gladys Young; they're all 
good girls of course, but why should they get more 
than $800.00 a year? After all, I'm president 
and I only get $50,000.00. 

I looked at the wall chart and saw that sales 
were falling. "Bad, very bad," I thought to my- 
self, "We must start a huge sales campaign. I'll 
send Roland Bonica to New York, John Meola 
to Philadelphia, Gordon Goodrich to Boston, and 
Richard O'Toole to Hollywood. I'll have de- 
signer Marion Johnson create a new Hollywood 
model, long sleeved, double thickness, purple, yel- 
low and green red flannels. Boy, that'll wow 'em ! 
That is to say — it will create a considerable sen- 
sation. Hollywood, eh? By cracky, I'll go my- 
self. I'll send O'Toole to Mudville, Illinois. 

And so, big business man that I was, I lost no 
time in putting my thoughts into action and soon 
was winging my way across the continent in one 
of Ralph Libby's new luxury airliners. The pilots 
I recognized as former Waltham High cheer 
leaders, John Madden and Walter Bennett, and 
the hostess was no less than the best looking girl 




ANDREW MEYER 

of the class of '41, Pauline Dicks. Ah, I certainly 
enjoyed that trip. Lovely weather, comfortable 
seat, wonderful scenery outside and, incidentally, 
inside. No wonder those boys were pilots. Dick 
Smelledge, national Beau Brummel, and "Chic" 
Rutter were sitting behind me. "Chic", I learned, 
had married a former Waltham girl — forgotten 
who — and retired to live on her income. Pretty 
lucky ! 

Arriving at Hollywood I looked up my old 
friend, producer Harold Simmons, who was hard 
at work on his new picture, "Stardust and 
Worms", featuring that dynamic, terrific Richard 
Keenan, supported by (not literally of course) no 
less than Hedy Lamarr. Naturally Hedy had aged 
a bit since our day, but they say she acts the part 
of a grandmother perfectly. 

"Simi" was happy to see me but unfortunately 
was burdened with a great many troubles. "My 
best actress, Mildred Edwardson," he complained, 
"threatens to go on strike if I don't pay her 
$20,000 a week, and Russ Longley modestly con- 
fesses that he is the best photographer in Holly- 



„_,_,_, — Class of 1941- 



wood and then asks for his salary to be doubled. 
Troubles, worries, it's terrible!" 

Wishing to change the subject, I asked him if 
there were any more local folks who had made 
good. 

"Naturally," he replied, "Hollywood is over- 
flowing with them. Leon Ginsburg has been a 
huge success in the screen version of Charlotte 
Wolk's new novel "Watch Out! I'm Dangerous." 
He used to be harmless enough ? I thought, but he 
seems to take to these Dracula and Frankenstein 
parts like a duck to water. Some hidden emotion 
never discovered, I suppose. Jason Samuels was 
another great success in villain parts, which he 
attributed to his valuable training in high school 
days, but finally said the strain was too much for 
him and settled down to keeping bees on his 
California estate. 

On the feminine side June Ralph, Barbara Hill, 
and Pat Smylie have established national reputa- 
tions as actresses and Kay Hickey, Waltham's 
prima donna, can be heard every morning over the 
"Sum Scum Soap Program." And so we discussed 
affairs for several hours. 

After saying goodbye to "Simi," I flew back 
East to resume my strenuous business pace. Think- 
ing that I might do some business with my class- 
mates, I returned to Waltham to find out where 
they were and what they were doing. Knowing 
that there are no better places to get news than 
in a sewing circle or a barber shop, I took a chance 
on the latter. On entering Bob Webb's barber 
shop, I recognized Paul Urpin, Frank Hart, and 
John Wallace reading funny books (after all these 
years) and playing pinochle in the corner. 

Before he had even applied the clippers, Webb 
was rambling on, "Yes sir, that was a tough cam- 
paign, but we finally got Tierney elected mayor. 
He's negotiating now with Charley Navien, chair- 
man of the school committee, to get half the 
teachers in high school dismissed. Claims it's for 
old times' sake. He gave Pete Lillis the job of 
director of cemeteries and has named Robert Mar- 
tin (alias "Crusher" or "Dillinger") director of 
the old folks' home. Pete can't do much damage 
in the cemeteries, but Martin's a pretty dangerous 
character to put in charge of the old folks. Tier- 
ney also has a whole new staff of secretaries con- 



sisting of Stella Morelli, Ethel Tyner, Gilda Pal- 
adino, and Marion Smith. Phyllis Forster and 
Elizabeth Bamforth have opened a beauty parlor 
with the intriguing slogan, 'When nature fails, 
try us.' Recently Phyllis Keith's picture has ap- 
peared in nation wide advertisements of spark 
plugs. Class glamour girl is going places I see. 
Kay Freeman and "Boots" Perna are successfully 
running a chain of 5 and 10 stores", and suddenly 
looking at the clock, he left off abruptly in the 
middle of his speech and snapped on the radio. 

"This is Nate Towne speaking sports' fans. 
Time to light up another pipeful of Whalen's 
blended ragweed. Ask for the original smoker's 
delight. 'It ain't hay'. Now let's see what's 
going on in the sports world. It is reported that 
Waltham's own Babe Ruth, 'Basher Manning' has 
been sold to the Braves for $45,000.00 Mere 
chicken feed for this hard hitting slugger. Ro- 
sario D'Argento, another Waltham man, is now 
coach for the Notre Dame football team. But 
today, folks, is women's day in sports. Betty 
Ohnemus has captured the national figure skating 
championship and Jane Dorval is the Eastern 
Women's Tennis Champion. Still more Waltham 
girls including Virginia Hughes, Ruth Leary, 
Irene Beane, Norine Henry and Gilda Sardi are 
on their way to the Belgian Congo to take part 
in the Olympic games. That concludes our three 
nrnutes sports review, folks. Ask for the original 
smokers' delight. Remember it ain't — " and in- 
terrupting him quickly, Webb turned off the 
radio. 

"Yes, sir" he said, looking rather worried, 
"Women are monopolizing everything in this 
town. What an age! Every place I turn I run 
into women. For instance, there's a new bakery 
shop down at the corner run by Ina Gallant, Mary 
Gasper, Lorraine LaRose, Eloise Martell, and 
Alxe Moody. Five of them owning one store. 
It's too much, I tell you. They've taken posses- 
sion of every job from driving trucks to selling 
vacuum cleaners. Why Eleanor Hughes, June 
Lcavitt, Margaret Lally, and Edith Maniace even 
own the Waltham National Co-operative Savings 
Bank. Carmela Russo, Laura Sangermano, Phyllis 
Nelson and Virginia Keyes own a chain of restau- 
rants and have put all the decent, law-abiding 



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males out of business. I read in the paper the 
other day that Marguerite Aucoin, Sarah Colletto, 
and Florence Somerset are traveling through Italy 
collecting priceless art treasures. Bah! phooey — 
double phooey! A woman's place is in the home 
... of course with . . . er . . . exceptions. I don't 
mind if women are successful on the stage as Pat 
Mcintosh, Peggy Hatch, and Virginia Caminiti 
are. That's perfectly all right by me, but in 
competition with honest, hard-working men, that's 
too much, I tell you, too much!" 

Realizing that in his fury Webb had forgotten 

himself and was cutting a zigzag path down the 

back of my skull, I grabbed my hat and coat, left 

him still raving in his shop, and headed towards 

"Dolber's Hashhouse" for a bite to eat. 

Suddenly startled by wailing sirens and a loud 
pealing fire alarm, I was amazed to see a flaming 
red fire engine roaring down Main Street with 
John Hurley skillfully maneuvering the huge 
truck through the traffic. Joseph Deneault, 
Leonard King, and Arthur Hagen were clinging 
on in back, while soon following it came Fire 
Chief Tom Quakers riding in his speedy limousine 
chauffered by James Gregorecus. When I saw 
Al Lyons and John Pendergast riding in the back 
seat of the chief's car, I asked James Darling, who 
was standing on the corner, what their official 
capacity was. "They have none," he replied, "but 
as retired, I should say, tired business men, they 
feel the need of recreation and fresh air and en- 
joy the ride." 

When I arrived at the restaurant my passage 
was somewhat blocked by two girls, Susan Boc- 
cabello and Mary Ferrelli who were marching up 
and down on strike. Since I realized this was only 
a publicity stunt of manager John Renna to at- 
tract customers. I ignored them and entered. The 
waitresses whom I recognized as Dorothy Reyn- 
olds, Yolande Cacciatore, Marguerite Tarpey, and 
Angelina Santalucito, were scurrying busily around 
waiting on tables. Over in a corner sat Stephen 
Papia fingering a shining ,gold watch chain and 
Norman Dube was seated next him doodling with 
a pencil on the white table cloth. Just two more 
successful classmates, I assumed. 

Suddenly catching sight of two very academic 
and scholarly gentlemen, Professor Robert Healy 



and Carroll Brown engaged in a heated argument 
at a nearby table, I went over to see what the 
trouble was. "Can you imagine it?" shouted 
Healy, "He thinks that 3.517 divided by the 
square root X + Y — 7.123 cubed equals the 
imaginary negative coefficient of 9.3415 minus 
X Y 2 W X 2 plus •" 

"No", I interrupted, "can't imagine it, never 
could imagine it, and never shall imagine it. So 
long, gents." 

Morton Milesky, now champion Fuller Brush 
salesman of America, and Bill Hopkins were eat- 
ing at another table, so I decided to join them. 
We chewed the fat for a little while (and I do 
mean fat and I do mean chew) and talked over 
the news. Though I had learned the where- 
abouts of most of my classmates, there yet re- 
mained several others about whom I knew noth- 
ing. Pearl Dougherty's great thirst for American 
history (or was it Mr Hodge's apples) has in- 
fluenced her to become a teacher of that subject 
back in our dear old Alma Mater. Two other 
classmates, Beatrice Olding and Barbara Pearson 
are society reporters for the Waltham Blare, and 
Irene Higgins, the famous violinist, who has 
abandoned classical music for rhumbas is now 
touring South America. Occasionally, Bill said, 
he sees George "Moneybags" Cox strolling around 
the city. George made a fortune on the stock 
exchange and retired to his home town to be a 
play boy for the rest of his days. 

Talented Marie Murphy, who has advanced 
far in the field of nursing, has just published her 
latest book, "The Romance of Kinaesthetic Pro- 
tonema as Applied to Gametophic Cytoplasm." 
(That may be her idea of romance but it's not 
mine) . 

After I had finished my meal I went over to 
pay the cashier. Recognizing her as being an- 
other member of the class of '41, Gloria Wood- 
land, I generously told her to keep the two cents 
change for old times' sake. I'm like that, you 
know; always like to spread a little sunshine 
wherever I can. 

No sooner had I left the restaurant than whom 
should I see but the one and only, "Dick" Ben- 
nett, now a major general in the army. Since 
Dick was evidently a man of great importance 



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and influence, it occurred to me that I might be 
able to get a sizeable contract for furnishing the 
army with my new Hollywood special tailor made, 
long sleeved, double thickness, purple, yellow, and 
green red flannels. This was the golden oppor- 
tunity of a lifetime. 

"Dick," I asked, "Do your men ever get very 
cold?" 

"Yes" he said. 



"In the winter time on cold, windy nights?" 

"Yes" he said again. 

"Well then, old pal, my very dear friend, my 
life long companion, let's drop into "Dolber's 
Hashhouse", said I taking his arm in a very 
friendly way, "I have a little proposition that 
might interest you." 

Andrew Meyer. 



UNCLE SAM SPEAKS 

To you who are about to graduate, 
Who soon must go to seek your pot of gold, 
I give the key that holds your country's fate, 
A key to opportunities untold. 

I pray that He will take you by the hand 
And guide you safely down the promised road, 
Because you hold the fate of this great land 
And you need strength and faith to bear the load. 

You soon will start to build your house of dreams ; 
This is America, and you may try 
Only while you can hear the eagle's screams, 
And see the Stars and Stripes above you fly! 

Joseph F. Hill, 1942. 







HERE AND THERE - at Waltham High 



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Juniors 




Sophomores 



CLASS ADVISORS 

Mr. Frank Sheehy, Juniors, left; 

Mr. Ralph Hollis, Sophomores, right 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Sitting: Roland Dion, President 

Standing: Thornton Reagan, Vice-President 

Jean Butcher, Secretary 

Edward Thomas, Auditor 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 

John Joyce, President 

Marie Dion, Auditor 

Norman Belliveau, Vice-President 

Paul Washburn, Secretary 



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Activities 




COMMERCIAL CLUB OFFICERS AND SOCIAL COMMITTEE 
Standing: Charles Pepper, Lucille Hatch, Patricia Mcintosh, James Zografos 
Sitting: June Ralph, Eleanor Bennett, Thomas Heaslip (Pus), Virginia 
Doucette, John Clark 

THE COMMERCIAL CLUB 



With a group of capable officers and with a 
membership of over one hundred, the Commercial 
Club started its activities early in the year. 

At the first meeting the Army was present in 
the form of motion pictures. Entertainment was 
provided by members of the Club and later, re- 
freshments were served. Also at this meeting our 
Superintendent, Mr. Slayton, gave a short talk. 

Christmas came right in time for our second 
meeting. The ever popular actor of Waltham 
High, Mr. Thomas Roche, was superb in his role 
of Saint Nick, and a galaxy of stars presented an 
amusing program, climaxed by refreshments of 
appropriate shapes and colors. Washington's 
Birthday provided us with a patriotic setting for 
our third meeting. Kay Hickey made the time 



more enjoyable by her delightful singing, and 
others gave readings. 

The May assembly of members was for the pur- 
pose of giving students helpful hints in connection 
with entering the business world. Of course all 
good things must come to an end, and the Com- 
mercial Club of 1941 was no exception. Re- 
gretfully we closed our books for the year, and 
held our last meeting on Prospect Hill. Here, 
in the coolness and peacefulness of the woods, a 
hungry crowd devoured weenies and pop; there- 
by culminating a highly diversified and satisfac- 
tory season. 

And last, but decidedly not least, we humbly 
express our thanks to Mr. George Lees for his 
untiring work and patience in planning and con- 
ducting all of our meetings. 

Dorothy Ellis, 1941. 



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DRAMATIC CLUB 




DRAMATIC CLUB OFFICERS 

Standing: Edwina Wilkie, Wilma Winberg 
Seated: Betty Eveler, Robert Healy, Marie Murphy 



The Dramatic Club began the year with a new 
faculty advisor, Miss Virginia Estabrook, who re- 
placed Miss Rand. The officers for the past year 
have been: President, Robert Healy; Vice-Presi- 
dent, Wilma Winberg; Secretary, Betty Eveler; 
Treasurer, Marie Murphy. The first meeting was 
held in September with an amateur show for en- 
tertainment. The following meetings consisted of 
presentations of plays, a quiz program, a Christmas 
party, and readings by Mr. Ward. The talent of 



the members was displayed at the annual presenta- 
tion of three one-act plays. One of the deciding 
factors in the success of the plays was the adver- 
tising ability of Ruth Alcott. Many of the mem- 
bers of the Club have participated in the Senior 
Play, the Operetta, Naughty Marietta, and many 
plays presented by the various clubs of Waltham. 
All in all, the past season has been very success- 
ful for the Dramatic Club. 

Robert Healy, 1941. 






MIRROR STAFF 




Top Roir: Robert Shedd, Sumner Dolber, William Calkins, Russell Longley, Howard Gadboys, Russell Carlson, George 

Kaitz, Charles Pepper, Robert Healy 
Middle Row: William Boisvert, Elaine Harnish, Ruth Power, Dorothy Ellis, Louise Giminarda, Margaret Donnelly, 

Joan McClutchy, Irene Kilpatrick, Joyce Hitchcock, Paul Washburn 
Bottom Row. Marie Murphy; Patricia Power; Edwina Wilkie; James Zografos, business manager; Andrew Meyer ; 

editor; Warren Towne; Ruth Greene, Marion Rouffe; Doris Besso 






BAND 



The first appearance of the Waltham Band this 
year was at the American Legion parade in Boston, 
September 24. 

Following this auspicious beginning, many 
formations were planned and practiced for pre- 
sentation at the football games. The applause 
that greeted the band after each of its intricate 
maneuvers was well earned reward for its hard 
work. 

On September 29 the band was heard over 
W. N. A. C. on Billy B. Vann's program, "Spread- 
ing New England's Fame." On October 16 the 
draft bill was ushered in with music by the band. 

During Christmas Week the band made its 
customary trip to the Waltham Hospital and City 
Hall, and on March 20 it held a well received 
concert at the South Junior High School. 



At the time of this writing the band members 
are looking forward to the Music Festivals which 
are to be held in Plymouth, Mass. ; Athol, Mass. ; 
and Lewiston, Maine. 

Many of the bandsmen are starting on a trip 
to Washington, D. C on April 28th. In Atlan- 
tic City, New Jersey, these boys will be spectators 
at the National Music Festival. Those of us who 
are graduating and leaving the band will look 
back with fond memories when we hear the snap- 
py rhythm of a march such as "Steel King" or 
the soft melodious tones of "Down South." 

And for those fond memories and happy times, 
f/e have to thank our competent director, Mr. 
Raymond Crawford. 



ORCHESTRA 



The orchestra, under the capable direction of 
Mr. Crawford, has once again completed a 
thoroughly enjoyable and music-filled year. 

No doubt all of you have heard on Tuesdays or 
Thursdays the melodious strains of "The Fortune 
Teller" or "Sullivan's Operatic Gems" or possibly 
the snappy "My Maryland" as the orchestra re- 
hearses. 



The orchestra this year has been prominent in 
many ways. Between acts of the Senior Play, and 
also at the Teachers' Play, the orchestra played to 
a receptive audience.. 

Later on, the orchestra furnished the orchestral 
background to the operetta "Naughty Marietta." 

Again on Class Day and at Graduation the or- 
chestra will furnish music when Mr. Crawford, 
for the last time in 1941, raises his baton to begin. 



"NAUGHTY MARIETTA" 



The audience settles down to quiet anticipation 
as the lights are dimmed. The curtain slowly 
rises, and the operetta "Naughty Marietta" is 
under way. It's gay costuming and tuneful 
melodies were highly pleasing to capacity audi- 
ences on the both nights it was presented. 

Such songs especially as "Ah, Sweet Mystery 
of Life," "I'm Falling in Love With Someone," 
and the ever popular "Italian Street Song" brought 
nostalgic memories to many in the audience. 

The female leads were well handled by Kath- 
erine Hickie and Naomi Haag. James Mackay 
and Warren Towne performed capably in the op- 



posite roles. Pauline Blay and Eugenia ONeii 
also received well merited applause for their fine 
singing and acting. 

Helen Grant, Bob Healey, Yolanda Cacciatore, 
and Charles Pepper supplied the comedy relief to 
perfection, as evidenced by the laughter brought 
forth by their efforts. 

The large supporting cast maintained the same 
high standards as the principals. 

Once again our own Mr. Raymond A. Craw- 
ford directed and presented an operetta fully as 
successful as any in the past. 

Charles Pepper, 1941. 






Athletics 




COACHES 

Mr. Walter Brinn. Hockey, Track 

Mr. John Leary, Football, Baseball 

Mr. Arthur Quinn, Basketball 




Class of 1941 — — — * 




SPORT CAPTAINS 

Standing: Donald Skakle, tennis; William Manning, football and baseball; 
Nick Abramo, golf; Richard Bennett, basketball; Edward Demarais, track. 






FACULTY MANAGERS 




MR. GEORGE L. WARD, Sub-Master 
Faculty Manager of Baseball 




FACULTY MANAGERS 
Left to right: Mr. Gallagher, Tennis; Mr. Mosher, Golf; Mr. Hodge, Football; 

Mr. Hood, Hockey. 



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FOOTBALL 




Courtesy 



PLANNING SOME NEW PLAYS 
Le// to Right: Richard Bennett; William Manning, Captain; Sumner Goldman; Coach Jack Leary. 



Waltham's 1941 football team finished an in- 
and-out season with three victories, four ties, and 
three defeats. Through the first five games, Wal- 
tham held its own, although at times not too im- 
pressively. Then came the Lynn English game in 
spacious Manning Bowl. After edging Medford, 
Waltham deadlocked a superior Newton eleven 
on a wet field. The Everett game, postponed 
from November 2, proved disastrous and Bennett, 
Falzone, and Goldman were lost for the final 
game with Brockton. 

Successive injuries to Tony Mancuso kept this 
defensive backfield star sidelined for most of the 
season. He was, however, elected captain of next 
year's eleven. 



Waltham's late-season slump was greatly due to 
the loss of Elliot, MacDonald, and Meisner. 

Many linemen will return next fall, but Butler 
and Mancuso are the only experienced backs that 
will not graduate. 

The schedule of 1940 and results: 











W 


O 


eplember 


21 


New Bedford 


Vocational 


20 







28 


Providence Central 


7 


7 


October 


5 


Somerville 




7 


7 




12 


Rindge Tech 







7 




19 


Haverhill 




39 


6 




26 


Lynn English 







13 


November 


9 


Medford 




14 


13 




16 


Newton 












23 


Everett 




7 


50 




28 


Brockton 















Courtesy of the Waltham News-Tribune 

MANNING AND MANCUSO 

Bill Manning, retiring captain, hands the responsibility of piloting next year's 
football team over to captain-elect Tony Mancuso. 



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FOOTBALL TEAM 
Front Row: Baiter, Lyon, Johnson, Koulopolis, Rutter, Wellington, Goldman, Nickerson, Mancuso, Juliano. 
Second Row. Butler, Chandonait, Joyal, Seichalone, Reed, Britton, Straggas, Falzone, Cummings. 
Third Row: Demarais, Abramo, Flett, Wadsworth, Towne, Leaf, Gregoricus, Manning, Collura, Rizzo, Hatch. 
Fourth Row: Thomas, Miller, Nussinow, McCarthy, Monahan, Mclnnis, Barnicle, Coolidge, Bennett, Seigen. 



i 
it 

to 




L 



Courtesy of the Waltham News-Tribune 
Butler smashing through the Somerville line for a substantial gain. 



. ,_^o-™<Xlass of 1941— 




Irene Kilpatrick twirls her baton with the best of them. 




CHEER LEADERS 
Kneeling: Marie Murphy, Doris Kilpatrick 
Standing: Francis Dougherty, John Madden, Roland Dion 



* — Class of 1941- 




1 



i: 



,._„_ 0_0_0_„_,,_0_ (> _0_„_,^(]| aS g Q£ Y 94 l -»—"<—— "-™—.~<~ O— , _■ _ «$ 



HOCKEY 



Waltham was represented by only an average 
hockey team in the Bay State League this year. 
This sextet finished the season in a tie for fourth 
place having won four games, tied three, and lost 
three in ten contests. Waltham started off im- 
pressively by beating Needham, defending cham- 
pions, and B. C. High. From this point on, how- 
ever, Waltham was just another hockey team, 
playing well at times and not so well at other 
times. 

The team was handicapped by lack of experi- 
ence and loss of all but two lettermen from the 
great team of the preceding year. Capt. Petrowsky 
and Rutter, the two holdovers, were chosen on the 
Bay State All-Stars second team along with Charley 



Butler, the leading scorer of this year's sextet. 

Next year's team promises to be of champion- 
ship calibre, as the whole first line and an abund- 
ance of reserve strength will return. 





THE 


SCHEDULE 




Waltham 


1 


Needham 





Waltham 


1 


B. C. High 





Waltham 


1 


Wellesley 


3 


Waltham 


1 


Framingham 


1 


Waltham 


1 


Wa';ertown 


1 


Waltham 


1 


Quincy 


1 


Waltham 


1 


Watertown 


1 


Waltham 





Walpole 


5 


Waltham 





Watertown 


1 


Waltham 


9 


Quincy 





Waltham 


3 


Framingham 









Warren Towne, 



1941 




BASKETBALL 

Although not a championship team, this year's 
quintet was one of the finest teams to ever repre- 
sent the school. The club had a record of eleven 
victories and five defeats, but its average of 33 
points per game is more indicative of its cham- 
pionship calibre than its won and lost record. 

Severely handicapped as it was by a series of 
misfortunes, the team never lost heart but kept in 
the running for the Suburban League champion- 
ship throughout the season. 

Much credit for the fine showing made by the 
team goes to Morton, Skakle, and Doyle, all of 
whom exceeded expectations. Norton led the 
team in scoring with 119 points. Eddie Petrovich, 
Johnny Furdon, Cliff Adams, Eddie Demarais 
Elliot Leaf, and Dick Bennett all aided greatly in 
the success of the team. Bennett, despite injuries, 
won recognition on the Suburban League all-star 
team. 

Next year's team appears to shape up favorably 
with the return of Furdon, Demarais, Adams, and 
Leaf. Several good prospects are also coming up 
from the jayvees and junior highs. 
THE SCHEDULE 



BASKETBALL 
Dick Bennett, Captain 



Waltham 


28 


Alumni 


25 


Waltham 


33 


Rindge Tech 


39 


Waltham 


22 


Brookline 


25 


Waltham 


49 


Cambridge 


25 


Waltham 


33 


Newton 


30 


Waltham 


26 


Arlington 


32 


Waltham 


35 


Woburn 


17 


Waltham 


34 


Cambridge 


25 


Waltham 


35 


Brookline 


30 


Waltham 


29 


Rindge Tech 


34 


Waltham 


34 


Arlington 


2 3 


Waltham 


45 


Watertown 


31 


Waltham 


24 


Newton 


20 



Warren Towne, 1941 







BASKETBALL TEAM 

Standing, Left to Right, Clifford Adams; John Furdon; George Norton; Eliot Leaf; Donald Skakle; Lawrence 

Celled: John Mazzarini; Edward Petrovich; Richard Bennett, Captain; Edward Demarais; Stephen Straggas; 

Charles Clark, student manager. 



c 
[ 

[ 

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Class of 1941- 




Courtesy of the W altham News-Tribune 

THE WALTHAM - BROOKLINE GAME 

Norton, No. 10, missed this one. But he scored 10 valuable points to help 
top Brookline 35 — 30 in an overtime game. No. 14 is Donald Skakle. 

watching the shot. 



Class of 1941- 



. 




BASEBALL TEAM 
Front Row: Edward Petrovich. Julius DAmicis, Alfred Dion, Tony Mancuso, Salvatore Collura, Norman Belliveau 
Middle Row: Joseph Stroum, Paul Hill, Robert Joyce, John Clancy, Mike Koulopolus, Howard LeBlanc, Lawrence 

Doyle 
Top Row: Herbert Nelson, Robert Clark, William Manning, Seth Johnson, Richard Gately, Charles Rutter, James 
LaRosee. student manager 



GOLF 

The golf squad looks forward to one of its most 
successful seasons. Several promising newcomers 
expect to give the returning members of last year's 
squad stern competition. 

Heading the veterans is Nick Abramo, who is 
in fine shape to better his performance of last 
year. Larry Doyle, Tom O'Brien, Lawrence 
Rogers, Henry Joyal, Arthur Hagen, Eddie Dem- 
arais, and Elliot Leaf are other veterans. George 
Veno and Robert Joyce are among the more 
promising newcomers. The schedule: 



28 



1 

5 

6 

8 

12 

13 

15 

19 

20 

22 

26 



-- APRIL 
Watertown at Waltham 

MAY 
Waltham at Brookline 
Belmont at Waltham 
Waltham at Lexington 
Newton at Waltham 
Waltham at Arlington 
Waltham at Watertown 
Brookline at Waltham 
Waltham at Belmont 
Lexington at Waltham 
Waltham at Newton 
Arlington at Waltham 



3 

] 

3 

: 






BASEBALL 




- 

: 



CAPT. BILL MANNING 



With only three veterans returning from last 
year's team, Bill Manning, Seth Johnson, and 
Johnny Clancy, chances for winning the Suburban 
League crown seem slim. Thus far, the team has 
played six games, three with league opponents, 
and has won four games. With good pitching 
and batting punch, the team may surprise. This 
year's nine is composed principally of juniors, so 
the outlook for 1942 is bright. 



THE SCHEDULE 



April 



] 



May 





W 


O 


9 


Middlesex 10 


5 


11 


Lynn Classical 6 


5 


18 


Revere 12 


11 


22 


Rindge Tech 6 


5 


25 


Newton 4 


16 


29 


Brookline 5 


6 


2 


Cambridge Latin 




6 


Arlington 




9 


Rindge Tech 




12 


Newton 




16 


Brookline 




20 


Cambridge Latin 




23 


Arlington 






Warren Towne, 1941 



TRACK 

Captain Eddie Demarais heads the list of re- 
turning lettermen and appears to be one of the 
best 440-men in Greater Boston interscholastic 
circles. Although Waltham lost its first dual 
meet to Cambridge Latin 33 — 24, the outlook 
for future meets is promising. 

Veterans from last year include Hague, Ben- 
nett, and Aliseo. Joyce, Ormand, Burdett, Segein, 
and Fedele are newcomers who are showing 
promise. 

THE SCHEDULE 



April 


21 


Interclass Meet 




24 


Cambridge Latin at Waltham 


May 


6 


Lexington at Waltham 




8 


Woburn at Woburn 




10 


New Hampshire Interscholastics at 
Durham, N. H. 




13 


Framingham at Waltham 




15 


Brookline at Waltham 




17 


Fitchburg Relays at Fitchburg 




20 


Winchester at Winchester 




24 


State Meet at Newton 



TENNIS 

A promising batch of 15 candidates reporting 
makes the future of the tennis team seem bright. 
Holdovers from last year include Captain Don 
Skakle, two year veteran; Harrison Whalen; 
Warren Towne; Bob Eaton; Hollis Broderick; 
Joe Hollicker; and Joe Hill. 

With this virtually all-veteran team Waltham 
should be a strong contender for the Suburban 
League title. Newcomers who are likely to press 
the veterans for positions are Bill Dennon, Ken 
Nickerson, Ray Shaughnessy, Carroll Brown, and 
Jimmy Hand. The schedule: 

MAY 
6 Newton at Waltham 
8 Lexington at Waltham 
13 Waltham at Winthrop 

15 Waltham at Belmont 

20 Waltham at Watertown 

21 Waltham at Newton 

22 Maiden at Waltham 
27 Arlington at Waltham 
29 Waltham at Melrose 






» Ji-^^-n^EMmEB-ca 



■"■ Class of 1941 ™ — *™~ 



Girls' Sports 




GIRLS' SPORTS 
Standing: Phyllis MacArthur, Virginia Hughes, Jean Leichman 
Silting: Jane Dolber, Doris Jacobs, Marie Dion 



BASKETBALL 








BOWLING 






BASKETBALL CAPTAINS 






VARSITY TEAM 






Virginia Hughes (Senior) 






M. LeCain 






Phyllis MacArthur (Junior) 






M. Bearce 






Jeanne Leishman (Sophomore) 






G. Cheney 






The basketball season seems to 


have fared bet- 




M. Johnson 






ter than the field hockey season 


from the report 




B. MacNally 






given below. 








SUMMARY 






SUMMARY 








February 12 






February 7 








Team One 






Seniors Waltham 15 


Wellesley 


11 


Waltham 


1261 


Newton 


1119 


Juniors Waltham 19 


Wellesley 


7 




Team Two 






Sophomores Waltham 12 


Wellesley 


15 


Waltham 


1258 


Newton 


1054 


February 13 








Team Three 






Seniors Waltham 28 
Juniors Waltham 25 


Weston 
Weston 


30 
5 


Waltham 


1191 


Newton 


1017 


February 20 








Varsity — Women Faculty 




Seniors Waltham 25 


Needham 


19 


Varsity 


1337 Women 


Faculty 


1222 


Juniors Waltham 16 


Needham 


11 




Sewell 






Sophomores Waltham 4 


Needham 


20 




Scotron 






March 7 








Ehler 






Seniors Waltham 41 


Newton 


22 




Stewart 






Juniors Waltham 18 


Newton 


26 








Sophomores Waltham 5 


Newton 


31 




Frost 







1 



-Class of 1941- 



FIELD HOCKEY 

FIELD HOCKEY CAPTAINS 

Jane Dorval (First Varsity) 
Marie Dion (Second Varsity) 

Our hockey teams much to the disappointment 
of the Misses Sewall and Frost, as well as of the 
girls themselves, met defeat in both their outside 
games. 



First Varsity 
Second Varsity 

First Varsity 
Second Varsity 



SUMMARY 

October 10 
Waltham 
Waltham 

October 22 
Waltham 
Waltham 

BASEBALL 



Needham 2 

Needham 1 

Weston 6 

Weston 



With spring here once more, our waltham High 
girl athletes again don their gym clothes to 
emerge from winter hibernation. Like so many 
young sheep, they prance out onto the high school 
green in the sunshine, to play baseball. We are 
looking forward to what seems to be a promis- 
ing season. 

Doris Ann Besso, 1942. 



ARCHERY 

Another year has passed in Waltham High and 
poung lads and lassies shake their fuzzy heads out 
of books long enough to indulge in frivolous 
sports. Our fair lassies, like so many female 
Robin Hoods, trip down to their Sherwood For- 
est on the corner of Beaver and Linden streets, to 
try their skill. As yet, I have had no report of 
any matches, but I am sure our Waltham High 
girls as usual will keep their arrows straight and 
bit the bull's eye. 

VOLLEY BALL 
VOLLEY BALL CAPTAINS 

Doris Jacobs (Senior) 
Phyllis MacArthur (Junior) 
Mary Castellano (Sophomore) 
Our volley ball season is so short we are unable 
to play any other than inter-class games. The 
girls all showed excellent playing and sportsman- 
ship. 

SUMMARY 

April 24 

Senior-Junior Senior 27 Junior 14 

Sophomore-Junior Sophomore 14 Junior 10 

The seniors seem to be the champions but they 

have had more practice and are more skilled. 









►<>-<^»<><a»-o-c 



Glass of 1941 



^■0<OlK 



'i«lMi-<»-ie«»'»Jt 



WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL CHEERS 



CHEER 1 
Waltham High! Rah! 
Waltham High! Rah! 
Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Waltham High! Rah! 
Team! Team! Team! 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
Waltham! Waltham! 



Rah! 
Rah! 

Rah! 



Waltham! 



CHEER 2 
Oh me, oh, my, oh mother! 
Oh mother, oh me, oh my! 
Three cheers for Dick and Buster 
And the boys of Waltham High. 



CHEER 8 
Give 'em the ax, the ax, the ax, 
Give 'em the ax, the. ax, the ax, 
Give 'em the ax, give 'em the ax, 
Where? 

In the neck, the nQC_k, the neck, 
In the neck, the heck, the neck, 
In the neck, in the-neck, 
There! 



CHEER 9 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
That's how you spell it! 
Here's how you yell it 
WAL-THAM, WAL-THAM, 






WAL-THAM : 



CHEER 3 
Waltham, rah rah team! (or name) 
or Waltham, rah rah (last name) 

c» 

CHEER 4 
Booma lacka, booma lacka, 
Bow, wow, wow! 
Chicka lacka, chicka lacka, 
Chow, chow, chow! 
Booma lacka, chicka lacka, 
Sis! boom! bah! 
Waltham High School, 
Rah, Rah, Rah! 



CHEER 10 
W with an A, with a WAL, with a WALTH, H 

with an A with an HAM, with a WALTHAM. 
L with an E, with an LEA, with LEARY, W 

with an H with a WHS 
Three cheers for Waltham High! 



CHEER 11 
Waltham High, Rah, Rah! 
Waltham High, Rah, Rah! 
Hoo-rah! Hoo-rah! 
Waltham High, rah, rah! 
Team! Team! Team! 



! 



CHEER 5 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
W-A-L-T-H-A-M 

Waltham! Waltham! Waltham! 
(optional) team! team! team! 



CHEER 12 
1-2-3-4,3-2-1-4, Who for? what for? 
Who ye going to yell for? 
Team! Team! Team! or (name) 



CHEER 6 
Wal-tham! Wal-tham! Wal-tham! 
Siss! boom! bah! 



CHEER 13 
Strawberry Shortcake! blueberry pie' 

V-I-C-T-O-R-Y 
Are we in it? 
Well I guess! 
Waltham High School, yes, yes, yes! 



CHEER 7 
Yea Waltham! Yea! team! (or high) 
Yea, yea Waltham team! (or high) 
Yea (first name)! yea (last name)! 



CHEER 14 
Come on red, come on white! 
Waltham, let's fight! 



* — . . — »— >< Class of 1 94 1 ' .>—>—.♦ 



A FOOTBALL SONG 

Words and Music by 
Elsie M. Cheney, Class of 1930 
Give a cheer for Waltham, 
Make it loud and strong. 
Give a cheer for the team mates, 
Then they'll know we're helping them along. 
Cheer the team to Victory, 
Let the colors fly, 
For it's W-A-L-T-H-A-M 
For Waltham High. 

REFRAIN 

Can't you hear your schoolmates spelling? 

W-A-L-T-H-A-M 

Can't you hear them yelling? 

W-A-L-T-H-A-M 

Waltham! Waltham! 

Rah, rah, rah, rah, rah - RAH! 

Give a cheer for Waltham, 

Make it loud and strong. 

Give a cheer for the team mates, 

Then they'll know we're helping them along. 

Cheer the team to Victory, 

Let the colors fly. 

For it's W-A-L-T-H-A-M 

For Waltham High. 

Cheer the team when winning, 

Cheer the Red and White. 

Cheer the team when they're losing, 

With our chers we'll help along their fight. 

If cheers will bring a Victory, 

Another cheer we'll try, 

For it's W-A-L-T-H-A-M 

And Waltham High. 

REFRAIN 



WALTHAM HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL SONG 

Adapted by A. N. Burke from the Victory March 
Song of Wesleyan University 

Here comes the team, boys, banners let fly 
They're bound to win for old Waltham High. 
Ring out the chorus, we'll sing our songs once 

again, 
And give a cheer for each of the men, RAH! 

RAH! RAH! 
Out from the barge they dash to the field 
On to the fray, and the glory 'twill yield, 
While we all cry, "Win boys or die! 
For you are striving for the fame of Waltham 

High." 

CHORUS 

Then, stick to it, boys, play the game ev'ry 

man, 
Fight it to a finish, do the best that you can. 
While we shout "Victory!" While we shout 

"Victory!" 
While we shout "Victory and Waltham High 

forever!" 
The red and white, boys, can't lose the fray, 
The colors must win new laurels today. 
So while they're fighting let's show we have no 

fears, 
And make the hills tremble with our cheers, 
RAH! RAH! RAH! 

Then, when we've won, boys, ring loud the bell! 
Let its old voice the glad tidings tell, 
While we proclaim the glorious name 
Of our beloved High School, dear old Waltham 
High. 

CHORUS 



BATTLE CRY 

Adapted by A. N. Burke from a Football Song 
of Wesleyan University 

Onward we're marching to victory 

With song and cheer, 

Let the game begin, for we're here to win; 

Ev'ry heart is devoid of fear. 

Put forth ev'ry ounce of strength, boys, 

Make ready to do or die; 

And, while you are fighting, we're here 

Shouting our Battle cry, Hi-yi! 

REFRAIN 
Then we'll fight for old Waltham High! 
Never give in. Fight to the end boys, 
Might and right will win, 
So keep on fighting 'til victory 
Crowns every guy. 
Then it's fight, fight, fight, 
For Waltham High. 

Break through their line, boys, we're fighting 

now . . 

With might and main, 

It is Waltham's day, and you're here to play 
Bring the victory home again. 
Throw back ev'ry play they made, boys, 
Just hold 'em and ne'er say die; 
We're back of you now and ever 
Shouting our Battle cry, Hi-yi! 

REFRAIN 



Class of 1941— 



A GRADUATE WRITES 



United States Naval Training Station, 

San Diego, California. 



Dear Mr. : 

I promised you a letter sometime ago and 
finally I got around to it. 

Starting with our entraining from Newport: 
We started with 10 men at 8 o'clock at night. 
The next morning we woke up in Albany. After 
a few hours liberty we started again. Passing 
through some mountainous country — ■ which 
finally whittled down to hills — we came to the 
farms of Pennsylvania and Ohio. Not much of 
interest, so we sleep all the day and night. 
However, when we pulled into Cleveland and 
got liberty we saw all the big cereal companies 
and the long lake steamers on Lake Erie. 
After a bit of night life we went on. The next 
place of interest was St. Louis, although the 
Mississippi was very disappointing. It seemed 
only a shallow, lazy, mud hole. However, there 
were crews of men working on flood control on 
the banks. Probably we saw it at its "low" 
season. All the middle west cities are about 
the same — poor imitations of the east. 

The people here, however, hadn't seen many 
sailors so we made quite a "hit" with them and 
were given parties etc. by big farmer Assoc'ts. 
When we went around to 'the night clubs we 
were sometimes mistaken for Britishers because 
we had on our blue flat hats and they thought 
only American sailors wore the white. We 
had quite a time putting on British accents and 
not denying the implication. 

We pulled out in the middle of the night and 
followed the Mississippi, right down to Kansas. 
For hours we looked out of the window and saw 
only flat, red clay fields. It was very, very 
monotonous and in my opinion they should 
"give Kansas back to the Indians." The Texas 
"panhandle" was just as desolate. We finally 
came to the eastern idea of the West — sandy 
wasteland with a few scattering of cattle. We 
then passed some big herds and felt better, so 
we decided Texas wasn't too bad. 

New Mexico and Arizona were very pretty al- 
though it was hot and muggy passing through 
the deserts. At Yuma, Arizona, we had liberty 
and saw some Indians — but they were a 
sleepy, retiring bunch so again our hopes went 
down. 

Then came the rockies. with jagged peaks 
and beautiful sun rises and sun sets. Really 
beautiful country. We went through the "Great 



American Desert" and the "Imperial Valley" 
where all your vegetables and fruits come from 
in the winter. 

Finally came the orange and grapefruit coun- 
try, and then into Los Angeles we went. We had 
liberty. L. A. is quite different from the East 
so we enjoyed the Spanish, Oriental, and other 
foreign sections. We were still in flat hats 
< which are wrong in this climate but our others 
were sent on ahead) and we again were mis- 
taken for British and had great fun as "impos- 
tors". The next morning we hit San Diego and 
our "home" for a while. 

As I read this over I And I forgot to mention 
the corn and wheat sections which we went 
through in the middle west. Also I wish to 
register disgust at the so called "ranches". 
They are sadly lacking in the romantic impres- 
sions we had. They are merely desolate farms 
with a small house and wind mill (of a sort). 
The cowboys were in ten gallon hats OK. but 
no six shooters. Gee! how could Hop-a-long 
Cassidy fool me — I thought he was the great 
American hero. Also an impression which still 
remains with me is the poverty of the people 
from Penn. to the Mississippi and from Kansas 
to Texas. They lived in small shacks with noth- 
ing much else. 

Well that is about all I can remember about 
the trip over. Maybe I am boring you but you 
can give me some afternoon sessions (if you can 
catch up with me). Apparently travel in the 
Navy is true. 

Then the enlistment posters said "education". 
I'm learning quite a bit in school here. I'm 
supposed to be an electrician. Well, 4 hours 
out of 8 is spent on electricity — 2 hours on 
guns — 2 hours on seamanship. We go to 
school 8 hours a day — 6 days a week. My 
marks have all been above 93% so far and I'm 
getting along swell. It isn't too hard to study 
such interesting subjects. Apparently the 
"education" was also true. 

Then comes "adventure". We seized 4 Ital- 
ian ships. I don't know what is going to come 
out of this, but maybe more adventure is in 
the wind. 

Please excuse me — I started to write a short 
note and I end up by writing a book — . 

Sincerely, 



P. S. 



Marshall Laforet. 
Please convey my regards to all— 






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ACCURATELY 
timed and cased at 
the factory — by 
American crafts- 
men. 

WALTHAM.the 
First American 
Watchmaker, em- 
bodies in every 
Waltham Premier 
the results of its un- 
excelled experience 
of more than ninety 
years in precision 
craftsmanship. 



WALTHAM WATCH COMPANY 



* 



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^o-^O-a^o-WT' >-<M^O«»-'i«»i>.fl»()-« 



»()4B»()«l»()«B-()4 



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Compliments of 



HORACE I. JOHNSON DRUG CO. 

Louis P. Tankel, Ph. G., Reg. Manager 



617 Main Street (Opp. City Hall) Waltham, Mass. 






Minnie's Beauty Shoppes 

BEAUTY SPECIALISTS 

Excelling in Permanent Waving 

Zotos and Jamal and Vapor. Marcel Machineless 

Prices $3 to $10 Ends $2, $3, $4 complete 

Beauty Items from 25 cents 

397 Moody Street 

over Kay Jewelry 
Wal. 1893 

416-A Highland Ave., Somerville 

Davis Sq. 
Tel. Som. 9324 

With or Without Appointment 

Featuring the Famous 

MacLevy System of Slenderizing 



SLENDERIZE 



Without Strenuous 
Exercise or Diet 

LOSE 2 TO 3 INCHES IN 10 VISITS 

Mechanical and Swedish Massage 
Vapor Cabinets. Mild Exercise 
Coll or Writ, for FREE Trial Visit 




AT YOUR SERVICE 



ADRIAN SMITH 



Custom Cleanser 



833A MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

Tel. Waltham 4529 



Reversible Coats a Specialty j 



i 



1 i 

NEW ALL COMPANY ! 

i 

Rugs and Carpets, Wallpaper, Linoleum, \ 

Paints, Venetian Blinds, Window Shades ! 



i 



107 Moody Street Waltham, Mass. 

Telephone Waltham 1824 

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»"-«^'--^a»'>-«^<'«ii. <".'»'» 



►O-^^O-^W-O-^^O-W^-O ■•»<>■«»•< > i ^""» i ^^<>« 



»<>-^»c >«»■ ( »^^< i-am-o-mm-o-^^ti+^a^^ti* 



Northeastern University 



College of Engineering 

Offers for young men curricula in Civil, Mechan- 
ical (with Diesel, Air-Conditioning, and Aero- 
nautical options), Electrical, Chemical, Industrial 
Engineering, and Engineering Administration. 
Classroom study is supplemented by experiment 
and research in well-equipped laboratories. 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in the professional 
field of specialization. 



College of Liberal Arts 

Offers for young men a broad program of college 
subjects serving as a foundation for the under- 
standing of modern culture, social relations, and 
technical achievement. Students may concentrate 
in any of the following fields: Biology, Chemistry, 
Economics-Sociology, English (including an option 
in Journalism), and Mathematics-Physics. Varied 
opportunities available for vocational speciali- 
zation. Degree: Bachelor of Science or Bachelor 
of Arts. 



College of Business Administration 

Offers for young men six curricula: Accounting, Banking and Finance, Marketing 
and Advertising, Journalism, Public Administration, and Industrial Administration. 
Each curriculum provides a sound training in the fundamentals of business prac- 
tice and culminates in special courses devoted to the various professional fields. 
Degree: Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



School of Law 

Offers three-year day and four-year evening un- 
dergraduate programs leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. A minimum of two years of 
college work, or its full equivalent, required for 
admission to undergraduate programs. Case meth- 
od of instruction. 

The School also offers a two-year evening pro- 
gram open to graduates of approved law schools 
and leading to the degree of Master of Laws. 

Undergraduate and graduate programs admit men 
and women. 



School of Business 

Offers curricula through evening classes in Ac- 
counting, Industrial Management, Distributive 
Management, and Engineering and Business, lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Business Ad- 
ministration in specified fields. Preparation for 
C. P. A. Examinations. A special four-year curri- 
culum in Law and Business Management leading 
to the Bachelor of Commercial Science degree with 
appropriate specification is also offered. Shorter 
programs may be arranged. Co-educational. 



Evening Courses of the College of Liberal Arts 

Certain courses of the College of Liberal Arts are offered during evening hours 
affording concentration in Economics, English, History and Government or Social 
Science. A special program preparing for admission to the School of Law is also 
evailable. The program is equivalent in hours to one-half the requirement for the 
A.B. or S.B. degree. Associate in Arts title conferred. Co-educatoinal. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Colleges of Liberal Arts, Engineering and Business Administration offer day programs for men only, 
and are conducted on the co-operative plan. After the freshman year students may alternate their pe- 
riods of study with periods of work in the employ of business or industrial concerns at ten-week inta- 
vals. Under this plan they gain valuable experience and earn a large part of their college expenses. 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS COUPON AT ONCE 

NORTHEASTERN UNIVERSITY 

Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the D School of Law 

□ College of Liberal Arts □ Evening School of Business 

□ College of Engineering □ Day Pre-Legal Program 

□ College of Business Administration □ Evening — College of Liberal Arts 

Name 

\ddress 

C-56 



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+o-mm~<->-^m-(.><^m-o-^m-<)-^^-0'mm-<-'-^^-<>-*am-<>'*^o-m^o-i^o-mi+U'^m*-omi»o-m*-o-^^0'^m-i.)-c^u-^m'0+^o-* 



»li«»0«»l)«»l)4»()«i0^l)«l»ll^()4»(0 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



NEW ENGLAND MICA COMPANY 



*-<>*M» <»-«■»-< i«»i)4»i)«»ll«*li-«»l !-€■»■ I iC»u-ffi»ii-a»i>4 



Compliments of 



j 

! THOMAS F. NOLAN 

i 

i 



| FISHER'S GINGER ALE I 
COMPANY 



133 MOODY STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 



60 WOERD AVENUE 



| WALTHAM, MASSACHUSETTS j 



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ki>-^i>«»(>-t 



► (.-^■-n-^»-ci.*raMi<3»-t>-« 






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H. L. STONE DAIRY 

Est. 1872 



MILK 



CREAM 



Sealed in Cellophane For Your 
Protection 




HIGGINS 

Commercial Machine School 

Courses on Electric Comptometers, Monroes, 
Sundstrands, Electric Elliott Fishers, Dictaphones, 
Electric Typewriting Machines, Burroughs, Elec- 
tric Calculators, Electric Card Punching Machines. 
Day and Evening 29th Year 
Free Placement Service. Open all year 

234 Boylston St., Kenmore 7696 



C F. CASHMAN 

Bicycles and Supplies Tires, Tubes and Accessories 

Carriage and Tricycle Tires Put On 

Keys Made and Batteries Charged 

Repairing 



55 PROSPECT STREET 



WALTHAM 



Compliments of 

GEORGE L. CHAPIN DAIRY 



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TEL. WAL. 2680 



HERBERT T. SPENCER 



INTERIOR FURNISHINGS j 

CUSTOM MADE SHADES j 

FINE CABINET WORK AND UPHOLSTERING j 

Draperies, Floor Covering, Awnings, Screens < 

708 MAIN ST. WALTHAM, MASS. I 



RUFUS WARREN 
and SONS 

Fine Footwear 

39 MOODY ST. 
WALTHAM, MASS. 

Repairing Promptly 

and 

Neatly Done 

Telephone Wal. 1430 



| Waltham 

| Wall Paper 8C Paint Co. 

Established 1905 

i 

j 591-593 MAIN STREET 

i 

Waltham, Mass. 

i 

| Waltham 3732 

( 

I L. Goldberg 

i 
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" ; ■«■»- •>*—*■<>■***■<> HM* - 1 -fl»i >-«■*<>-«■»■< >>«■»< . I 4Bi^«»l>«»»-a»n **■»■<•-" 



W. S. MADDEN 

AUTO BODY REPAIR 
Tops and Upholstery 



«i 



11 Myrtle Street 



Tel. Wal. 2456 






►< >■*■»-<>■«■►■<>■«■».< i< 



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»(>■«»( i»,V 



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;'W 



I 

i 
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i 
i 
i 
I 

j IN THE LONG RUN j 

i 
i 

you and your friends will j 

prize the portrait that looks j 

like you — your truest self, j 

free from stage effects and f 

little conceits. I 

i 

It is in this "long run" pho- j 

tography that PURDY sue- j 

cess has been won. | 



I 



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I 

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photographic self by having j 

that one cannot laugh at or j 

j cry over in later years. I 



For the present pleasure and j 

future pride protect your i 

Portraiture by the Camera j 

PURDY make the portraits. j 

i 
i 

PURDY ! 



i 

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j 
j 
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i u;o tremont street boston, mass. f 

i 
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Official photographer, Waltham High School | 

Class of 1941 J 



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MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES — Four-year liberal arts course 
leads to A.B. and B.S. degrees. Pre-Professional courses available in Junior College 
preparing for entrance to Schools of Podiatry and Veterinary Medicine. 



SCHOOL OF MEDICINE 



Four-year course leads to M.D. degree. 



SCHOOL OF PODIATRY (CHIROPODY) — Three-year didactic and 
clinical course. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY — Prepares for State Board examinations. 
Comprehensive two-year course. 



SCHOOL OF VETERINARY MEDICINE 



D.V.M. degree in four years. 



All schools of Middlesex University are co-educational. 

Modern, newly erected buildings beautifully situated on a 10 0-acre cam- 
pus. Comfortable new dormitories. Extensive, well-equipped laboratories. High- 
grade faculty of specialists for each school. 

The Schools of Podiatry and Pharmacy are located in the Back Bay 
Bldg., 415 Newbury St., Boston. 

Catalog will be sent on request. 



MIDDLESEX UNIVERSITY 



WALTHAM, mass. ! 

I 



Compliments 
of 



POLLY ANN 



Compliments 



of 



FOOD SHOP 



A FRIEND 






»n^»r« ><<«»< , '^(i«a»o4 



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I 



I 



I 



I 



i 

i 



Thirty (30) College scholarships available to those who need 



course meeting requirements for entrance to Suffolk Law School. Associ 
| "ate in Arts certificate awarded upon satisfactory completion of 60 s. h. En- 



course. 



I 



I EDUCATION FOR THE DEFENSE ! 



I 



j OF DEMOCRACY ! 

! I 

I What are YOU planning to do with the next few years of vonr life? Start your 

college education for a life-time profession? Work at a trade in a defense job? 
' Many ambitious young people are already combining both plans and you can do it 

j too by enrolling at 



! 

SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY I 

i 



! 

You can attend the evening division of any department and keep | 



a full-time day job. Or you can attend the morning division and 
« work -afternoons or evenings on a defense job. Make these next 

| fewv;years count for something definite in your educational pro- ' 

,gr.am and at the same time prepare yourself better to serve your i 

' country in its program of Defens for Democracy. 



I 



iniriy (ov ) uonege scnoiarsnips avanaoie 10 uiose wuu neeu 
I financial aid and can meet our scholastic standard in competitive 

examination July 1, 1941. Only 19 41 graduates of New England f 

high schools are eligible. Applications close June 15th. Send for i 

information. 



! 
I 

i 

! SUFFOLK COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS: 



I 



5-yr. day or evening course for A.B. degree. Also special 3-yr. Pre-legal 
course meeting requirements for entrance to Suffolk Law School. Associ- 



| 

trance requirement: 15 acceptable units. Cultural and pre-professional j 

programs. i 

I SUFFOLK COLLEGE OF JOURNALISM: j 

f 5-yr. day or evening course for B.S. in J. degree. Practical professional 

i 
i 
s 
i 

SUFFOLK LAW SCHOOL: j 



[ 

j SUFFOLK COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION: 

5-yr. day or evening course for B.S. in B.A. degree. Majors in accounting 
I advertising or business management. 

i 

i 

I 4-yr. day or evening course for LLB. degree. Entrance requirement: 60 I 

s. h. of academic work. j 

! SUFFOLK GRADUATE SCHOOL OF LAW: ! 

' 2-yr evening course for LLM. degree. For LLB. graduates only. 

{ IMPORTANT: High School graduates not eligible to enter Suffolk Law 

School or Suffolk Graduate School of Law without previous academic work. J 



I 



| OPENING DATE IN ALL DEPARTMENTS — Sept. 22, 1941 



( 

Call, write or phone CAPitol 0555 for catalog | 

i 

I SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR I 

Derne Street Beacon Hill Boston, Mass. J 



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u 



L 



FINDS HER CALLING 




"I'm going to Fisher School!" A wise decision for a young woman 
— for she has selected a business school of charm and efficiency. 
Unusual facilities, up-to-date courses, n<"V methods and a well- 
balanced program of cultural and technical development prepare 
Fisher girls for the exacting needs of modern business . . . place 
them on employers' preferred lists. 

One and two year Executive, Secretarial, and Business courses. 
Particular emphasis given to personality expression. The Fisher 
Plan offers opportunities for individual advancement; students 
progress as rapidly as they are able. 

BOSTON : 118 Beacon Street SOMERVILLE: 374 Broadway 



THE 



ftslm 



SCHOOLS 



DEAN DAIRY 

Waltham 4090 

Delicious Ice Cream, Jersey Cream and Milk 
Fancy Table Eggs and Butter 



1 



"IF IT'S LUMBER CALL OUR NUMBER" 

GUTHRIE LUMBER COMPANY 

BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone Waltham 1300 

167 LEXINGTON STREET WALTHAM, MASS. 






i 



I 






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».||«B.n^^ll«»lH 



THE FAY SCHOOL OF BOSTON 
52 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

IREXE FAY, Director 



In a cultured, refined atmosphere, the students oi 
The School, through an intensive, well-planned, and 
diversified curriculum, becomes a competent secre- 
tary. 

The two-year course combines academic and execu- 
tive secretarial subjects. The one-year course is 
devoted entirely to executive secretarial subjects. 

You are cordially invited to visit the School at any 
time. Catalogue will be sent upon request. 




i 






WATCH CITY TAXI SERVICE 

Cadillacs for all Occasions 

TAXI 

CALL WALTHAM 5000 



24 Hour 
Service 



673 MAIN STREET 
(Cor. Common St.) 



i 
i 

| FAULKNER'S 

J "THE INTERESTING STORE" 

! 

! Opp. City Hall 



Wal. 3114 



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► M-a^i^"^"-"*"-^'" 



»-O^W-<>-^»(H 



»0<W»0-4B»U-« 



t 



i 

i 

f A. HOLICKER & CO. 
I 

i 

I Exclusive Agents for 

| FARM BUREAU BAGS 

( 

Rear 107 Moody Street 
i Waltham, Mass. 



DIAMONDS, JEWELRY, RADIOS 



EASY BUDGET TERMS 



353 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



* Waltham, Hamilton, Gruen Watches j 



] H. E. Weston Jewelry Co. j 



The Upstairs Store that Saves You Money 



Hi-«Ki«»M.^. 1 -.<mii.^ii-^il^.>-^ ( i-i»o-«Kl.^.^ 






•.<!-«*»■ !.-«»- 1 >-ff=>0- 



Compliments of 



SPECIAL PRICES FOR 
SPECIAL ORDERS 



I Anderson's Food Shop 

I Moody St. Opposite end of Orange St. | 

i 
i 



i LIBERTY LUNCH \ 

! ! 



A FULL LINE OP BAKERY PRODUCTS 



855 Main Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



m -mum-* >-^»- i >-c^»-i ><*»-< >- 



*->-mm-t<-^m-o-4 



»i>^di»i>«^[). 



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•><>«»< i-^^o-m 



+ <i-mm-o-^m-->-» 



-> )-««>i >■•»■<) ^^(H 



( 

! NEWTON SECRETARIAL SCHOOL 

i 



Day and Evening Classes 

Summer Courses 

Intensive One-Year Course 

Courses for College Graduates 

Individual Progress 



PLACEMENT 



Esther C. Blackburn, B.S., Ed.M. 
Director 



3 92 Centre Street 

NEWTON, Massachusetts 

BIGelowi 5 7 11 



f -. l «»()^()«a»i)4Bo«»u4B^)^i)^()4^()^i)«»()«»t)'a»i)«»0'^()^(i'^o4B-o«»o«»i)'^()'^ii«»<)'i»ti'a»i)^()«ii^o«»(i^()«»i)'^()^i)^()i^( 

i 

] MIDDLESEX ELECTRIC SUPPLY CO. 

The Complete Electrical Store 



689 MAIN STREET, WALTHAM 



Tel. Wed. 0437 



r 



You are Invited to Our New Camera Department 

\ 



JOSEPH O'NEIL 

OPTOMETRIST 

Examination by Appointment 

Flynn Building, 657 Main St., Waltham. 

Office Hours - 8:30 A. M. to 5: P. M. 

Wednesdays and Fridays, 7 to 8:30 P. M. 



.•i-^^o-^m-i-^M-a-m^ii-^a+a-mmm-u-mm-ii-^^-a-^^O'^^in 






»( ,-^m- ( )+mm>o-^m> 1 1 «■» (>■«■»•<> ^»< > <■»- 1 i ■* \» 



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Compliments of 



For Most Satisfaction 

Buy Your RADIO 

and RECORDINGS 
at 



WALTHAM COAL CO, 



BEECHER'S 



ESTABLISHED 1872 



405 MOODY STREET 
WALTHAM 



j^ ,_„ „_, , _ , , »_ ^ i( _ ( ,_„_, 






I 

i 

j Compliments of 

i 
i 



W.H. NICHOLS & SONS 



Res. Tel. Wal. 2646 Bus. Tel. Wal. 1643 

MOLLICA 
MOTOR SALES 

Waltbam's Oldest Dealer 

Established 1918 

2 3 Years in Business 

DE SOTO & PLYMOUTH 
CARS 



24 COMMON ST. 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



B. Mollica, Prop. 



►'**<« 



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IM >~m~-n^^m-< >-«•*»-< ■,-*-<> + 



FOR A LASTING 

GRADUATION GIFT 

OF JEWELRY 



! KAY JEWELRY CO. 

I 389 Moody Street 

1 Waltham, Mass. 
I 

I "America's Largest Credit Jewelers" 



Nationally Advertised Watches 

At Cash Prices or Credit 



I THOS. P. HOLLAND CO. ! 



Successors to 

J. W. MURPHY & CO. 



Clothier and Furnisher 



95 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



^■mm-i'-mm-i*-* 



HI-«»l)^»«*ll'M»n'«»"-«»-ll'<»''«» l '-«»i)<l'<» n -<»' l -*»l , -Cl»-"-f»-i''rJ»n<» <1 <I 



Compliments of 



GEORGE E. OLSON 

MEN'S SHOP 



MENDELSOHN'S 



337 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



469 Moody Street 
Waltham, Mass. 



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•"■^^■o-^m-ii-Kfyt 



—-•- — ——■•- 



Corsage Specialist 

ANDERSON 

Florist 



196 MOODY ST. 
WALTHAM, MASS. 



READ & WHITE 

MEJV'S and 
WOMEN'S 

FORMAL 
CLOTHES 
RENTER 

FOR ALL OCCASIONS 

QUALITY ALWAYS" 

111 SUMMER STI\EET, BOSTON, MASS. 
WOOLWORTH BLDG., PROVIDENCE, It. I. 




Tel. Wal. 1843 






The 

^ titer tcan Superior 

Shoe Rebuilding Co. 

Ed. J. Provencher, Prop. 



COMPLIMENTS OF . 



EMBASSY THEATRE 



True To Its Name 
Reliable To The Minute 

705 MOODY STREET 
Waltham, Mass. 



WILLIAM HARTNETT, Manager 

Matinees at 2 o'clock 
Evenings at 8 o'clock 






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A»n« 



t»^<<.^ii^ii4 



»n-^»n^»-o«w-<)-« 



BURDETT 
COLLEGE 




Ml 



0/-B THE TRAINING MEETS THE 
NEEDS OF THE TIME 

the immediate demand 

tor the future opportunity 



One- and two-year courses. Well- 
qualified faculty. Extra-curricuia 
activities. Day and Evening classes. 
Previous commercial training not re- 
quired. Courses meet the needs of 
business and government. Calls 
for graduates exceed the supply. 
Catalogue contains full information. 



BUSINESS TRAINING SINCE 1379 



BURDETT COLLEGE 



Telephone HANcock 6300 



5 6 ST U A RT f5:tvR,t:E.^'v : ,BiQ S T;vb?M|g- : 



l »(l«»O.^ll.^O-^(>-^»(>-^()-^0-^<)<^(|.^l)-<^<>-^(>-^<>-^(>-<li»-l)-^<)-«^(l-^(l-^l>-^"-^ll'"»<l-^l>-^"-^<>-^l>-"'^»-^l>-^"'«"»-<>'^l>-^l>-«^0'«»C 




MOODY 8C REGAN 



PRINTERS 




Tel. Wal. 1111 

621 MAIN STREET 
WALTHAM 



> i 



i i 



Harry A. Starr Fuel Co. 

"Serve You Right" 
Genuine New England Coke 



420 MOODY STREET 

Tel. Wal. 0884 j 

i 
I 

Fuel To Meet All Requirements ' 

i 



■ ■■ — r "i 



<)*♦!♦ 



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How to Save FAST! 

.Just two things to know about 
fast, easy saving . . . save a 
LITTLE at a time . . . save 
that little, REGULARLY. 

Here, everyone saves that way. 
On or before the last Thursday 
of each month, thousands of 
Waltham and Watertown fami- 
lies make savings payments here. 
For each of them, their payment 
is identical, each month. 

That gives them fast saving, be- 
cause their savings- payments are 
frequent . . easy saving because 
no single payment is more than 
the can surely spare. 




CO-OPERATIVE 

H| Jft IkB MM FIFTY-ONF. rials OF VIUVICI 

W3MKMM W\. 56 Main St., Watertown, Moil. 



PRETTY SOON . . . You are 

Going to be Worth $88,000 * 

If you had it all at one time, I'll wager 
you'd put a good part of it in the bank 
. . . quick. 

But while the chances are that all those 
thousands (and maybe many more) will 
pass through your hands in the next 40 
years, it's probable too that most of that 
money will come to you a few dollars at 
a time. 

So ... if you're going to KEEP some of 
those thousands, there's only one way to 
do it . . . save it as you get it ... a few 
dollars at a time, regularly . 

My office door is always open to welcome 
any student of Waltham High School who 
wants to discuss fast, easy, systematic sav- 
ing, as the beginning of a thrifty plan for 
living. 

LOWELL A. WARREN, Treasurer 
WATERTOWN CO-OPERATIVE BANK 

* That's what one expert estimates the average earnings 
of high school graduates in a lifetime. 



(Autogrjtpljs 



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Compliments of 



WALTHAM FEDERAL SAVINGS 
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 



Where you can save any amount 
at any time 



716 MAIN STREET 



WALTHAM, MASS. 






UPHOLSTERING 



By An Old American Concern 



BUTLER'S 



Upholstering and Ref inishing 

WE SPECIALIZE IN THE BEST OF CUSTOM BUILT 

FURNITURE 
Waltham 3616 



98 Maple Street, Corner Moody 



Waltham, Massachusetts 



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